Paphlagonia

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Related to Paphlagonian: Anatolia, Cleon, Sinope, Euxine

Paphlagonia

(păf'ləgō`nēə), ancient country of N Asia Minor, between Bithynia and Pontus on the Black Sea coast, in modern Turkey. A mountainous district with the Halys as its chief river, Paphlagonia had a string of Greek colonies (including Sinope) along its coast. It was not a political unit and was annexed and occupied by the kings of Bithynia and Pontus respectively. It was won (63 B.C.) by the Romans.

Paphlagonia

 

an ancient country in Asia Minor on the Black Sea, surrounded by Bithynia, Galatia, and Pontus. Cities, including Sinope, were founded by Greek colonists along the coast. A rural population of Syrian origin predominated in the interior. In the sixth century B.C., Paphlagonia was conquered by Lydia, and then by Persia. In the late fourth and early third centuries B.C., it was ruled by Alexander the Great and his successors. Beginning in 281 B.C., the country’s interior was governed by local dynasties.

In 107 B.C., Paphlagonia was inherited by Mithridates VI Eupator. After the Third Mithridatic War (74–64 B.C.), the coastal region was included by the Romans in the province of Bithynia; the interior was annexed to the Roman province of Galatia in the sixth or fifth century B.C. Paphlagonia became an independent province under Diocletian in the third century of the Common Era.

Paphlagonia

an ancient country and Roman province in N Asia Minor, on the Black Sea
References in periodicals archive ?
Scholars have long agreed that the idea of a suicidal blinded man who wants to be led to a cliff to end it all came to Shakespeare through the story of the Paphlagonian king in book 2, chapter 10, of Sir Philip Sidney's Arcadia.
It records an oracle of Apollo of Claros and a statue of Apollo the Savior paid for by his priest, a Paphlagonian named Miletos son of Glycon.
Such characters were often fictional, or their names were etymologised (Dikaiopolis, Trygaios, Lysistrata), but occasionally historical figures of late fifth-century Athens, semi-fictionalised, of course, such as Kleon (barely disguised as the Paphlagonian in Knights), Sokrates (in Clouds) and Euripides (in Acharnians, Thesmophoriazousai and Frogs) occupy the Aristophanic stage.
Survey results are presented in six chronologically organized analytical chapters covering the Paphlagonian past from the Paleolithic period through the Ottoman era, concluded by a final chapter (chapter eight) of summary and synthesis.
the Middle and Late Bronze Ages) was arguably the most fascinating period in Paphlagonian history.
The role of the area as a border zone in many periods is everywhere emphasised as a key factor in understanding Paphlagonian history and topography, one that is rightly reflected in the title.
Thereby the name IcoANNOV may refer to John Paphlagonian, comes sacrarum largitionum in AD 498 (Dodd 1961, 29, 54, 57).
Specific topics include the military campaign of Dareios I against the Scythians, the history of Thrace in respect to the Achaemenids, relationships between conquerors and indigenous peoples, Achaemenid influence on art and iconography in Paphlagonian rock tombs in Anatolia, the influence of the Persians on a pair of sphinxes adorning a temple to Zeus in Southwest Anatolia, Achaemenid influences on architecture in Colchis in modern-day Georgia, Achaemenid and Achaemenid-inspired metalwork in the northern borderlands of the Persian empire, and the defensive structures of the urban settlement site of Semibratnee in ancient Labrys.