Paradigmatic Relationship

Paradigmatic Relationship

 

an opposing relationship of several elements of language involving a choice of one of a number of mutually exclusive elements. The language units are thus joined in a speaker’s consciousness despite the impossibility of the units’ actually being joined in a speech event. The either-or function of a paradigmatic relationship is opposed to the both-and function of a syntagmatic relationship, in which elements of language coexist when they are realized in a speech event. Parádigmatic relationships are nonlinear and nonsimultaneous. A form’s syntagmatic characteristics are apparently dependent on its paradigmatic properties.

Paradigmatic relationships were first described by F. de Saussure, who termed them associative relationships, in opposition to syntagmatic relationships.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the above syntagm, for example, the word 'young' stands in a paradigmatic relationship with the words 'old', 'tall', etc.
The articulation of more types of paradigmatic relationships in thesauri and subject heading lists and the presence of alternative classification numbers in different contexts, or even disciplines, offer potential for the web and the hierarchy to work together.
Ferdinand de Saussure, the seminal semiotician, suggested that paradigmatic relationships belong to the relatively stable system of language.
A modern dictionary, therefore, will concern itself not only with meanings, but with syntagmatic and paradigmatic relationships.
As noted earlier, paradigmatic relationships are those that are context-free, definitional, and true in all possible worlds.
First they are limited in what they can express insofar as they manage--and frequently they don't--to limit their hierarchy structures to paradigmatic relationships.