Paradise

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Paradise,

town (1990 pop. 25,406), Butte co., N central Calif., located along a broad ridge in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada range, inc. 1979. It is mainly residential with a growing population. Cattle are raised and fruits, olives, nuts, wheat, and nursery stock are grown. Gold was discovered nearby in 1859. A wildfire in 2018 largely destroyed the town.

Paradise:

see Eden, Garden ofEden, Garden of,
in the Bible, first home to humankind. In it were the trees of life and of the knowledge of good and evil. Having eaten the forbidden fruit of the latter tree, Adam and Eve were banished from the garden and God's presence.
..... Click the link for more information.
; heavenheaven,
blissful upper realm or state entered after death; in Western monotheistic religions it is the place where the just see God face to face (sometimes called the beatific vision).
..... Click the link for more information.
.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Paradise

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Paradise, asteroid 2,791 (the 2,791st asteroid to be discovered, on February 13, 1977), is approximately 20 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 3.7 years. Paradise is a concept asteroid, named after the Garden of Eden. J. Lee Lehman asserts that if this asteroid is well-aspected in a natal chart, the native believes paradise can be found in this existence. If, however, “the asteroid is poorly aspect, then the person is less than optimistic that Paradise exists outside of the movies.” Jacob Schwartz gives Paradise’s astrological significance as “beliefs in perfection.”

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford Press, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.
The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Paradise

 

according to most religious teaching, for example, in Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Buddhism, the place of eternal bliss for the souls of the righteous.

Sources for the concept of paradise go back to primitive beliefs in the existence of the soul beyond the grave. In the Old Testament, paradise is depicted as a beautiful garden in which the “first man and woman,” Adam and Eve, lived until they were driven out after they fell from grace. In the subsequent development of Christian doctrine, paradise was conceptualized as a place to which the righteous returned after death.

In many religions, the bliss of paradise is contrasted with the torments of the sinners in hell. Unlike the detailed elaborations of conditions in hell, however, representations of paradise are vague and sketchy. The concepts of “paradise” and “hell” are used by the clergy for the religious aims of influencing the consciousness and feelings of believers.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

paradise

1. The court of the atrium in front of a church.
2. The garth of a cloister.
3. A Persian pleasure garden, usually elaborately planted.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Paradise

poetic name for heaven. [World Rel.: NCE, 1213]
See: Heaven

Paradise

See also Heaven, Utopia.
Bali
Indonesian island; thought of as garden of Eden. [Geography: NCE, 215–216]
Brigadoon
magical Scottish village that materializes once every 100 years. [Am. Music: Payton, 100–101]
Canaan
ancient region on Jordan river; promised by God to Abraham. [O.T.: Genesis 12:5–10]
Earthly Paradise
place of beauty, peace, and immortality, believed in the Middle Ages to exist in some undiscovered land. [Eur. Legend: Benét, 298]
Eden
earthly garden of luxury; abode of Adam and Eve. [O.T.: Genesis 2:8]
Elysium
(Elysian Fields) abode of the blessed in afterlife. [Gk. & Rom. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary]
Garden of the Hesperides
quiet garden of the gods where golden apples grew. [Gk. Lit.: Hippolytus; Gk. Myth.: Gaster, 25]
Happy Hunting Ground
paradise for American Indians. [Am. Culture: Jobes, 724]
Happy Valley
beautiful spot in Kashmir’s Jhelum Valley. [Indian Hist.: Payton, 300]
hissu
where trees bear fruits of lapis lazuli. [Babylonian Lit.: Gilgamesh]
land of milk and honey
proverbial ideal of plenty and happiness. [Western Cult.: Brewer Dictionary]
Land of the Lotophagi
African land where eating lotos fruit produced amnesia and indolence. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Br. Lit.: “The Lotos-Eaters” in Norton, 733–736]
Nirvana
eternal bliss and the end of all earthly suffering. [Indian Religion: Jobes, 1175]
Shangri-la
utopia hidden in the Himalayas. [Br. Lit.: Lost Horizon]
Suhkavati
garden of jeweled trees and dulcet-voiced birds. [Buddhist Myth.: Gaster, 24]
Timbuktu
fabled land of wealth and splendor. [Eur. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1084]
Tlapallan
land of luxuriance and red sunrise. [Aztec Myth.: Gaster, 25]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

paradise

1. heaven as the ultimate abode or state of the righteous
2. Islam the sensual garden of delights that the Koran promises the faithful after death
3. (according to some theologians) the intermediate abode or state of the just prior to the Resurrection of Jesus, as in Luke 23:43
4. the place or state of happiness enjoyed by Adam before the first sin; the Garden of Eden
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Paradise

Paradise is a subsystem (a set of packages) developed to implement inter-processes, inter-tasks and inter-machine communication for Ada programs under Unix. This subsystem gives the user full access to files, pipes, sockets (both Unix and Internet) and pseudo-devices.

Paradise has been ported to Sun, DEC, Sony MIPS, Verdex compiler, DEC compiler, Alsys/Systeam compiler.

Version 2.0 of the library. E-mail: <paradise-info@cnam.cnam.fr>.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

Paradise

An earlier family of graphics cards for PCs from the Paradise subsidiary of Western Digital Corporation, Irvine, CA.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, while the Jewish sources to be surveyed below combined the possible achievement hic et nunc with paradisical terminology, they attempted to elevate the human behavior to less than a common form of experience.
Likewise, as we will see, Logistilla's palace does not bear witness to Ruggiero's entry into a "paradisical state." The narrative gives no space whatsoever to the hero's "virtuous self-knowledge" and "spiritual well-being." Not only has Ariosto complicated his retelling of Homer and Virgil by evoking Dante, he has also modified this later subtext significantly.
The Lovely Bones is narrated from heaven by a fourteen-year-old girl who has been raped and brutally murdered by a neighbor (think Our Town with dismemberment) and who receives, as compensation for her earthly travails, an afterlife that includes a nice apartment, plenty of teen-girl magazines, a paradisical version of high school, and a front-row seat from which to observe the folks back home coping with their grief and puzzling over her killer's identity.
(4) For this counter paradisical theme also see Kanaganayakam 91; and Tew, B.
Especially if they also believe that that other universe is a paradisical escape from the tribulations of the real world.
This Israeli/Euro co-production can expect far from paradisical returns and muted TV interest after its Venice showcase.
Alternatively, traveller-explorers spoke romantically of preserving the natural beauty and riches of paradisical landscapes, and the interests of simple, effeminate, and child-like natives from the clutches of Western and Asian capitalistic exploiters (Savage 1984).
The first method was the physical creation of paradisical spaces, of oases contained within the confines of a given dwelling.
The Last Amateurs depicts a paradisical world that is separate and distinct from the Gomorrah of major-college basketball.
Thompson skillfully shows how the organization of the novel parallels the three-part structure of The Divine Comedy, as Romola moves progressively from an infernal to a paradisical relationship to Florence, with an interim purgatorial segment as she comes to accept her loveless marriage to Tito Melema and works to achieve, under Savonarola's bidding, her own and Florence's spiritual regeneration.
It is true that film directors now falsify even their own history, but in mid-Stalinism we get the movie "Red Star" about a Soviet collective farm which was so excessively paradisical that it could not be shown in the Soviet Union.
A paradisical Africa does not exist and has never existed.