Paraguayans


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Paraguayans

 

the basic population of Paraguay, constituting approximately 99 percent of all inhabitants. Paraguayans number approximately 2.6 million (1973, estimate). The Paraguayan people as a distinct ethnic entity developed primarily in the 17th and 18th centuries as a result of the intermixing of Guarani Indians and descendants of the Spanish conquerors. In an anthropological sense, Paraguayans are primarily mestizos. More than half are bilingual, speaking both Spanish and Guarani; a small number speak only Spanish, and the rest only Guarani. Paraguayans are Catholics by religion.

REFERENCES

Narody Ameriki, vol. 2. Moscow, 1959.
Natsii Latinskoi Ameriki. Moscow, 1964.
Nitoburg, E. L. Paragvai. Moscow, 1964.
References in periodicals archive ?
14 in Asuncion, the Paraguayan capital, to launch a joint investigation.
Department of Energy donation of radiation detection equipment to the Paraguayan Radiological and Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARRN).
A good Paraguayan side never gives up and we proved that again today," Haedo Valdez said.
Chesterton explains how elite Paraguayans hoped these religious groups would convert the Chaco Boreal into a "civilized" region analogous to the eastern Paraguay.
This meant that while it took Bolivian troops and supplies more than two weeks to complete the journey, the Paraguayans made it in four days, making tactical movements and resupply much easier.
The Australians stayed until late in the evening, mixing with the Paraguayans.
They knew they had missed an opportunity of a lifetime -- to witness the Paraguayan national team's selfprofessed No.
Perhaps Duarte was sensitized to the separatist nature of Paraguayan Anabaptists because he occasionally attended the Spanish-language Mennonite Brethren congregation in the capital city where his wife, the first lady, Maria Gloria Penayo Solaeche, was a member.
Most Paraguayan trafficking victims are found in Argentina, Spain, and Bolivia; smaller numbers of victims are exploited in Brazil, Chile, France, Korea, and Japan.
The Paraguayan leader, elected in April last year, also insisted he would not resign over the scandal despite a call from a senator aligned to his own party.
The Swiss travelers Rengger and Lompchamp (1828), describing a voyage to Paraguay in 1825, noted that there were few Blacks in Paraguay, either enslaved or free, and that the majority of Black Paraguayans had been born in the colonies (Boccia Romanach 2005: 80).
Ambassador to Paraguay James Cason has recorded and released a CD of Paraguayan music classics sung in Guarani.