paranoid personality

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paranoid personality

[′par·ə‚nȯid ‚pər·sə′nal·əd·ē]
(psychology)
An individual characterized by the tendency to be hypersensitive, rigid, extremely self-important, and jealous, and to project hostile feelings so that he or she easily becomes suspicious of others and is quick to blame them or attribute evil motives to them.
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Psychiatrists make a distinction between the milder paranoid personality disorder described above and the more debilitating delusional (paranoid) disorder.
The appeal judges have heard fresh evidence relating to where Martin was standing when he fired the shots and whether he could be said to have acted reasonably in self-defence, given the state of his mind - described by Dr Joseph as a paranoid personality disorder.
Yesterday Porter, said to have a paranoid personality disorder, admitted common assault.
The most common diagnoses were antisocial personality disorder, seen in 43% of the sample, paranoid personality disorder, seen in 27% of the sample, and borderline personality disorder, seen in 24% of the sample.
The fresh evidence, not heard by the jury which convicted Martin because it was not gathered until after his trial, was yesterday the subject of a clash of professional opinion between experts as to whether the farmer was suffering from a paranoid personality disorder and therefore entitled to the defence of diminished responsibility.
Mr Wolkind called evidence from Dr Philip Joseph, consultant forensic psychiatrist at St Mary's Hospital, Paddington, west London, that Martin had a paranoid personality disorder of long-standing, leading to the conclusion that at the time of the killing he was suffering from abnormality of mind.
A paranoid personality disorder led him to think people were ganging up against him.
A judge ordered a psychological evaluation of the family, and Generosa was diagnosed with a paranoid personality disorder.
The evidence, not heard by the jury which convicted Martin because it was not gathered until after his trial, was the subject of a clash of opinion between experts as to whether the farmer was suffering from a paranoid personality disorder and therefore entitled to the defence of diminished responsibility.