Paranthropus


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Related to Paranthropus: Paranthropus boisei

Paranthropus

(pârăn`thrəpəs): see AustralopithecusAustralopithecus
, an extinct hominin genus found in Africa between about 4 and 1 million years ago. At least seven species of australopithecines are now generally recognized, including Australopithecus afarensis, A. africanus, A. bahrelghazali, A.
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Paranthropus

 

a genus of higher biped fossil primates, whose bone remains have been found in East and South Africa. It closely resembles the group Australopithecus, and together the two form the family (subfamily) Australopithicinae. Paranthropus was larger than Australopithecus and was primarily vegetarian, as can be deduced from the structure of the molar teeth. He had a relatively large brain (averaging 510 cc), which externally resembled the brain of modern anthropoid apes. Paranthropus lived between 4 and 1 million years ago.

REFERENCE

Iakimov, V. P. “Avstralopitekovye.” In the collection Iskopaemye gominidy i proiskhozhdenie cheloveka. Moscow, 1966. (Trudy In-ta etnografii AN SSSR, vol. 92.)
References in periodicals archive ?
This regression equation was then applied to nine extinct hominids belonging to the genera Australopithecus, Paranthropus, and Homo, as well as modern H.
Incisor size and wear in Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus robustus.
Las especies que se han reconocido en este periodo pueden agruparse en dos grupos taxonomicos diferentes: al primero con rasgos mas robustos, se le suele colocar en el genero Australopithecus, aunque cada vez tiene mas aceptacion la idea de ubicado dentro de su propio genero: Paranthropus.
Caption: Scientists made a virtual 3-D reconstruction of the ear anatomy for Paranthropus robustus and determined that the hominid heard the high-frequency sounds needed to discern certain consonants.
The new finger fossil is more humanlike than comparably ancient Olduvai hand fossils from Homo habilis, or handy man, and Paranthropus boisei, or Nutcracker Man, the scientists find.
While the hominids from the genus Homo that evolved from australopithecines like the 3 million-year-old fossil Lucy-considered by many the matriarch of modern humans-were broadening their food choices, a short, upright hominid known as Paranthropus boisei that lived side by side with them in eastern Africa was diverging toward a more specific, C4 diet.
But traits such as sturdy jaws and thick tooth enamel recall Paranthropus, an African hominid line that existed from about 2.
Published in the journal PLOS ONE, the researchers said the fossil represents one of the most recent occurrences of Paranthropus boisei, a very early species of hominin.
The international team of researchers from institutions in the US, Italy and Spain, analyzed several auditory ossicles representing the early hominin species Paranthropus robustus and Australopithecus africanus.
The 3-D designer based in Sinop, Brazil, has digitally reconstructed the faces of over 15 extinct hominid species, including Paranthropus boisei, a distant cousin to modern humans.
The latest research, by an international team of researchers including Professor Francis Thackeray, Director of the Institute for Human Evolution at Wits University, sheds more light on the diet and home ranges of early hominins belonging to three different genera - Australopithecus, Paranthropus and Homo.
The study was done on the teeth of a creature called Paranthropus boisei, a primate that lived between 2.