Parapet gutter

Parapet gutter

A gutter that is located behind a parapet wall.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

parapet gutter

A gutter which is constructed behind a parapet wall.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sloping roofs have an eaves gutter, flat roofs have a parapet gutter, and a number of sloping roofs meeting at one point have a valley gutter, which links up with either an eaves or parapet gutter.
One area of gutters that we often overlook is the hidden valley or parapet gutter. These gutters are tucked out of sight and we don't notice the leaks until they appear on the ceiling.
Flat roofs have a parapet gutter and a number of sloping roofs meeting at one point have a valley gutter, which links up with either a parapet or eaves gutter.
Sloping roofs have an eaves gutter, which may be made of iron on period properties, making it expensive to replace like for like (necessary on listed buildings, for example) and heavy to manoeuvre if you're doing it yourself; flat roofs have a parapet gutter; and a number of sloping roofs meeting at one point have a valley gutter, which links up with either a parapet or eaves gutter.
I THINK it was the American architect Frank Lloyd Wright who said: "Anyone in my firm can design a building with a parapet gutter, as long as they pick up their cards at the end of the week."
The problem is that, unlike the normal overhanging rainwater gutter, if the parapet gutter blocks up, then it overflows into the building rather than on to the ground beneath.
This gutter, like the one that hides behind a parapet wall, (parapet gutter) is often ignored until they go wrong.
Valley and parapet gutters are common on older, larger properties but they are often found where there has been an extension.