paraplegia

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paraplegia

(pâr'əplē`jēə), paralysis of the lower part of the body, commonly affecting both legs and often internal organs below the waist. When both legs and arms are affected, the condition is called quadriplegia. Paraplegia and quadriplegia are caused by an injury or disease that damages the spinal cord, and consequently always affects both sides of the body. The extent of the paralysis depends on the level of the spinal cord at which the damage occurs. For example, damage to the lowest area of the cord may result only in paralysis of the legs, whereas damage farther up on the cord causes possible loss of control over the muscles of the bladder and rectum as well or, if occurring even higher, may result in paralysis of all four limbs and loss of control over the muscles involved in breathing.

Most frequently the cause is an injury that either completely severs the spinal cord or damages some of the nervous tissue in the cord. Such damage could result from broken vertebrae that press against the cord. Diseases that cause paraplegia or quadriplegia include spinal tuberculosis, syphilis, spinal tumors, multiple sclerosis, and poliomyelitis. Sometimes when the disease is treated and cured, the paralysis disappears, but usually the nerve damage is irreparable and paralysis is permanent. Treatment of paraplegia and quadriplegia is aimed at helping to compensate for the paralysis by means of mechanical devices and through psychological and physical therapy.

Paraplegia

 

paralysis of both lower or both upper limbs. It arises as a result of organic lesions of the nervous system (organic paraplegia); sometimes it results from psychogenic disturbances, as in paraplegia from hysteria.

paraplegia

[‚par·ə′plē·jə]
(medicine)
Paralysis of the lower limbs.

paraplegia

Pathol paralysis of the lower half of the body, usually as the result of disease or injury of the spine
References in periodicals archive ?
"It's been a challenging role because the film is a thriller, plus my character is that of a paraplegic," Mukesh said in a statement.
Sadar Ayub, who is a paraplegic sportsperson and Captain of Punjab Wheelchair Cricket Team, was excited to be part of the national event and said 'coming to this event reminded us all that we have more abilities than disabilities.'
While talking to The Express Tribune Sadar Ayub, who is a paraplegic sportsperson and Captain of Punjab Wheelchair Cricket Team, was excited to be part of the national event and said: 'coming to this event reminded us all that we have more abilities than disabilities.'
Representatives of the Paraplegics Association of Slovenia pointed out that the Personal Assistance Act will enter into force on January 1, 2019, which, according to Daneta Kastelic, means "independent life".
The composing, editing, compilation of material, typesetting and printing of this first issue have provided experience and training for the paraplegic patients.
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The results so far are promising: these experimental techniques have enabled a small, carefully selected group of paraplegic patients to walk hundreds of meters in the laboratory, using walkers for support.
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And one day, the system pioneered by Nick Donaldson and Tim Perkins, two biomedical engineers based at University College London, could change the life of all paraplegics, although the surgical procedure is still being researched and is not yet available to patients.
A paraplegic from Strasbourg, France took his first steps in 10 years following a revolutionary operation in which an implanted microchip restored nerve function.
A European research consortium that has achieved a breakthrough in medical research that could help paraplegics move again met in Brussels on March 20 for an update on their research and to study the feasibility of carrying out further research.