Freudian slip

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Freudian slip

any action, such as a slip of the tongue, that may reveal an unconscious thought

Freudian slip

[¦frȯid·ē·ən ′slip]
(psychology)
A verbal mistake that suggests some underlying motive, often sexual or aggressive in nature.
References in periodicals archive ?
The very fact that slips of the tongues have two synonymous terms, namely spoonerisms and parapraxes indicate two different hyposthases of the level where the disruption takes places.
What is really inexplicable is what yokes together the diverse forms of unconscious invention that Freud writes about in the book where he treats of parapraxes (what I've called the parapractical).
Parapraxes that had seemed mere slips (as when the speaker of the Austrian parliament opened a difficult session with the words, "I hereby declare the sitting closed") are revealed to have been intelligibly motivated.
Yet they are still purposeful, as can be seen most easily in the case of parapraxes. Thus forgetting a friend's name may well reveal an unconscious antagonistic impulse towards that (supposed) friend.
The letter contains two interesting parapraxes, flat-out mistakes about the plot of Hamlet, and both of them can be traced to the same moment in the play.
I hope to show that what appear to be flaws, even mistakes, in Lee's film--what I will call "cinematic parapraxes"--are in fact symptoms of the film's resistance to a certain aesthetic ideal of seamless, intcrnal consistency and closure.
As already noted, in the analytic situation, Freud, true to the heritage of experimental psychology and like an automatic self-recording machine, maintains a "suspended attention" in order not to select but to register virtually everything and to cling to the accidental and the insignificant such as parapraxes, slips, and puns.
(10) Christensen is more concerned with the Lacanian "agency [instance]" or "materiality of the signifier" (parapraxes, puns, freudian slips, literal overdeterminations of figural meaning), since it is this rhetorical drift of language--exemplified by the Byronic digression and employed by Byron's endlessly inventive strength--that prevents the poet from being reduced to the stereotypes reiterated by public consumption.
In that sense, the truth of his own text will have to be provided less in its explicit statements than its half-said implications, in its hidden presuppositions or even in its extremely rare but always felicitous parapraxes. To illustrate this idea, I will just mention one parapraxis that I round revealing.