Parcae


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Parcae

(pär`sē): see FatesFates,
in Greek religion and mythology, three goddesses who controlled human lives; also called the Moerae or Moirai. They were: Clotho, who spun the web of life; Lachesis, who measured its length; and Atropos, who cut it.
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Parcae

see Fates.
See: Fate
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References in periodicals archive ?
e la tipologia Kax'avxioaaiv come Parcae, lucus (4, 460): per contrarium uerba dicuntur, quando contra quam dicimus accipiuntur, ut Parcas dicimus Fata, cum non parcant, et lucum, cum non luceat.
This offers yet another example of a young woman imperilled at sea whose misfortune has been frozen into art, but as an intertext of "Le Rouet d'Omphale" Catullus 64 is most sinister once the Parcae, the sisters of Fate, have been introduced:
The three Fates have a common Indo-European origin: the Greek Moirai, the Latin Parcae or Fata, and the Scandinavian Nornes, Dises and Valkyries.
Parere fati discite legibus, manusque Parcae iam date supplices, qui pendulum telluris orbem Iapeti colitis nepotes.
Old men so duely, As, sooth, the Parcae thought him one,
The Romans identified the Parcae, originally personifications of childbirth, with the three Greek Fates.
He turns the witches into the Parcae and, above and beyond that, into the constitutive condition of the tyrant's own being, not into an imposition forced onto Macbeth, whom they follow.
512-837-2904; Barr, Ann, Tracor, 512-929-4179; Weston, Earlene, PARCAE, 512-837-9181; McMillian, Gary, SPEC, 512-385-0082.
After sketching, as the final scene of the ekphrasis, Bacchus's cortege arriving to liberate Ariadne from her woes (249-264), the poem returns to the wedding and describes the departures of mortal celebrants and the arrivals of divine guests (265-302), until it focuses on the spinning Parcae, who sing a prophetic wedding hymn whose stanzas proleptically recount the exploits of Achilles on the Trojan plains (303-381).
And you, Parcae, truthful in your song, which, once ordained, a stable boundary will preserve throughout eternity, now join happy destinies to those already fulfilled.
They function not as enabling Muses but as Parcae, controllers of destiny.
349), the union of Pluto and Proserpina is sanctioned by the Parcae, and the divinity of Calliope herself recalls for us the theological nature of poetry which Orpheus, her mortal son, seems to wish to transfer to human concerns, such as the physical loss of his wife - as does his inset character Myrrha in her own dubious inspirations.