Brainworm

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Brainworm

impersonates variety of characters in his trickery. [Br. Lit.: Every Man in His Humour]
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Parelaphostrongylus tenuis (Nematoda) and Fascioloides magna (Trematoda) in moose of southeastern Manitoba.
1993) Factors affecting Parelaphostrongylus tenuis in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Maine.
Infrapopulation dynamics of Parelaphostrongylus tenuis in white-tailed deer.
Here, we report on interspecific variation in the climbing behavior of various gastropod hosts of Parelaphostrongylus tenuis commonly found in Algonquin Park, Ontario, and infer from the degree and temporal pattern of arboreality, the potential for bias in the commonly used cardboard collection technique and the relative importance of various gastropod species in the transmission of P.
These results have two implications with respect to the transmission dynamics of Parelaphostrongylus tenuis.
Parelaphostrongylus tenuis (Pryadko and Boev) in the moose and white-tailed deer of Nova Scotia.
In addition to the absence of wolves (Canis lupus) and low levels of predation by black bear (Ursus americanus), disease and parasites present among moose populations in other regions, including Parelaphostrongylus tenuis (brainworm) and Dermacentor albipictus (winter tick), appear to exist at low levels in the Cape Breton population.
This is usually related to "moose sickness" or parelaphostrongylosis as a result of the transmission of the nematode parasite, Parelaphostrongylus tenuis, normally carried by white-tailed deer (Telfer 1967a,b; Peterson et al.
6; 1 - 9) of adult meningeal worms, Parelaphostrongylus tenuis, within the cranium; the meninges of 12, (excluding 3 unsuitable for examination), were cloudy in appearance.
Brainworna, Parelaphostrongylus tenuis, in moose, Alces alces, and white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus, of Nova Scotia.
The idea that a parasite, Parelaphostrongylus tenuis, causes long-distance dispersal in moose was suggested, primarily by the popular media, as the reason for this unusual behavior.