Parentalia


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Parentalia

February 13
This was an ancient Roman festival held in honor of the manes, or souls of the dead—in particular, deceased relatives. It began a season for remembering the dead, which ended with the Feralia on February 21. This week was a quiet, serious occasion, without the rowdiness that characterized other Roman festivals. Everything, including the temples, closed down, and people decorated graves with flowers and left food—sometimes elaborate banquets—in the cemeteries in the belief that it would be eaten by the spirits of the deceased. February 22 was devoted to forgiveness and the restoration of friendships broken during the preceding year.
SOURCES:
DaysCustFaith-1957, p. 53
DictFolkMyth-1984, p. 673
DictRomRel-1996, p. 174
FestRom-1981, p. 74
FestSaintDays-1915, p. 31
OxYear-1999, p. 75
Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary, Fourth Edition. © 2010 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Les deux fetes des morts prevues par le calendrier religieux romain, (7) les Dies Parentales ou Parentalia, qui interviennent a la fin de l'annee du 13 au 21 fevrier, et les Lemuria, des 9, 11, et 13 mai, parfois considerees comme opposees du point de vue liturgique, feraient en fait partie d'un ensemble complet de rites inegalement conserves.
That expectation is not for epiphanic revelation nor cynical confirmation, the two poles between which Hill has made his poetic web, one that is meant to catch grace: "the things of the earth snagging the things of grace" he writes in "Parentalia." Hill collects suffering from the earth --the dead at Shiloh, in the Shoah--as martyrs and as victims.
He also knew that Roman funeral rituals included a festival of the family dead (parentalia) and wax busts of famous ancestors.