Parícutin

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Parícutin

(pärē`ko͞otēn), active volcano, c.8,200 ft (2,500 m) high, Michoacán state, W central Mexico. In one of the most spectacular eruptions of modern times, Parícutin burst forth from a cornfield on Feb. 20, 1943, and grew discontinuously until 1952, spewing forth over a billion tons of lava. It buried the town of San Juan Parangaricutiro and the village of Parícutin, whence its name. The cone is a remarkable example of volcanic growth, and its development was closely studied by international scientific teams.

Parícutin

 

(also Paricutín), a volcano in Mexico, in the Transverse Volcanic Axis. It rises to an elevation of 2,774 m (according to some data, 3, 170 m). In 1943 there were great spurts of incandescent scoria, alternating with ejections of steam and ash, and significant lava flow. Parícutin’s eruptions, which lasted until 1952, were a combination of the strombolian and Vulcanian types.

References in periodicals archive ?
Vascular plants on the cinder cone of Paricutin Volcano in 1958.
Manner of invasion of volcanic deposits with further evidence from Paricutin and Jorullo.
Plant life of Paricutin Volcano, Mexico, eight years after activity ceased.
Fitosociologia y sucesion en el volcan Paricutin, Michoacan, Mexico.
Vegetation of tephra deposits 50 years after the end of the eruption of the Paricutin Volcano, Mexico.
Progress of plant succession on the Paricutin Volcano-25 years after activity ceased.
Even though Paricutin is one of the few volcanos in the world that has been studied from the moment of its very birth as a hole in the ground, it is of much more than mere geological interest.
In September 1759, the Jorullo Volcano was born not far from Paricutin under similar circumstances, although the first scientific account was not written until Alexander Von Humbolt visited the site in 1803.
Shortly after the initial tremors, he fled to the small farming village of Paricutin, just over a mile from his field, to fetch a fried.
That the church of San Juan should be where Paricutin was officially baptized as a volcano is not insignificant.
For some time, the village of Paricutin and the town of San Juan had been involved in an acrimonious land dispute.
Visiting geologists showed farmers that Paricutin was simply a new version of the area's many other dormant cinder cones, in the rich soil of whose craters they planted corn.