Parietal Musculature

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Parietal Musculature

 

(also somatic or skeletal musculature), part of the muscular system of the majority of chordate (acraniate and vertebrate) animals and of man. It contrasts with visceral musculature in phylogenetic, embryonic, histological, and functional respects.

Parietal musculature is derived from the muscle layer of the myotome and is innervated by nerve fibers of the ventral roots of the spinal nerves and by the corresponding motor portions of cranial nerves. All parietal musculature consists of striated muscle, which provides for the animal’s direct interaction with the environment. The parietal musculature includes muscles that control the movements of the body, tail, limbs, eyes, and hypoglossal apparatus.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.