parietal lobe

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parietal lobe

[pə′rī·əd·əl ‚lōb]
(anatomy)
The cerebral lobe of the brain above the lateral cerebral sulcus and behind the central sulcus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Type 2 performance did not show any remarkable differences with respect to the baseline, except for a small ERD in the parietal areas (mainly right) and an ERS in the occipital areas during T3.
An additional parietal area displayed pronounced activity as toolmakers gained skills.
1992), using ERPs with a shorter temporal resolution than PET, reported that the high amplitude negative slow wave that was evident over the right parietal area became less lateralized to the right hemisphere when the subject was holding the information in their working memory.
Given that the MRT is a visuospatial task then this change in activity should be maximal over the parietal areas.
The generalized activation obtained for electrodes positioned over the right parietal area for all groups (although largest in males majoring in physical science) suggests that this brain region may be particularly important for successful MR performance, a notion that is consistent with much of the previous neuroimaging literature (M.
The study established that sleep difficulties were linked with a more rapid decline in brain volume over the course of the study in widespread brain regions, including within frontal, temporal and parietal areas.
04], with the post-hoc tests showing significantly higher activation in the parietal areas than the frontal (p<0.
6-7] Neuroimaging studies have shown that cognitive training can enhance brain activity in the frontal, temporal, and parietal areas.
During the last 200 ms before PT two distinct zones of the negative shift over frontal and parietal areas (with the maximums at Fz, F3 and Pz, P3 sites respectively) were recorded (fig.
The TOT state was characterized by lower activation, in the 300-500 ms post stimulus interval, of left temporal and frontal areas, bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, and right fusiform gyrus, which may underlie the genesis of TOT, and greater activation, in the 700-800 ms interval, of bilateral occipital, left temporal, and right frontal and parietal areas, corresponding with the unfruitful search for the name once the state has been produced.
The first part controls the visual component, and it is comprised of the occipital, temporal and parietal areas of the brain.