Park Chung Hee


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Related to Park Chung Hee: Park Geun-hye, Syngman Rhee

Park Chung Hee

(pärk chŭng hē), 1917–79, president (1963–79) of the Republic of Korea (South Korea). Starting (1940) his military career in the Japanese army, he joined the new South Korean army after the establishment of Korean independence at the end of World War II and rose through the ranks. In 1961 he was a member of the military junta that overthrew the civilian government. He became chairman of the junta government and in 1963 was elected president. He was reelected in 1967 and again in 1971, having amended (1969) the constitution to allow himself a third successive term. Although his government aided economic progress by emphasizing export-oriented growth, it became more dictatorial over the years. In 1972, Park declared martial law, allegedly to institute revitalizing reforms, and again altered the constitution to give himself almost unlimited power. Despite demands for democratic government, censorship, political repression, and torture of political prisoners increased. In Aug., 1974, Park's wife was killed during one of the several assassination attempts against him. Park was killed in 1979 by the head of the Korean Central Intelligence Agency.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both admirers and critics would agree that Park Chung Hee was instrumental to South Korea's developmental success.
Eckert notes in Park Chung Hee and Modern Korea, the first of a projected two-volume history, judgments about Park's legacy "continue to serve as major fault lines in South Korean politics." The book is less a standard biography than an analysis, through the figure of Park Chung Hee, of Korea's authoritarian past.
How come Park Chung Hee was able to elevate his South Korea from being an "impossible country" in 1961 to one of Asia's economic miracles in 1979?
More attention, I would argue, should be focused on the days when her father, dictator Park Chung Hee, helped create the system of family-run conglomerates, or chaebol.
These cases look at: the period of American military occupation (1945-1948) and the "fragments" of Western biomedicine and traditional practice that would be assembled into the South Korean medical community following World War II, the importation of the medical infrastructure of the US military government in Korea and its influence on the creation of subsequent South Korean public health policy, the period of the Korean War and its aftermath (1945-1960) and Seoul National University Hospital as a site for international development interventions, the family planning campaigns initiated with the arrival of the Park Chung Hee regime in 1961, the simultaneous national antiparasite campaigns, and the present-day market for aesthetic and plastic surgery.
As the daughter of former ROK president Park Chung Hee, Park's victory is believed to have been aided by her fellow countrymen's nostalgia for her father's 18-year rule, which helped to lift the ROK from poverty to developed-nation status.
Park, who seeks to become the first female president, is the eldest child of former President Park Chung Hee, a general who rose to power through a military coup in 1961 and ruled the nation with an iron fist until he was shot dead by his intelligence chief in 1979.
alert this afternoon after the bizarre restaurant shooting of President Park Chung Hee.
During the 1950s, Park claims, Protestantism under Syngman Rhee achieved sociopolitical dominance because the most influential members of the political leadership were Protestant, a situation that changed after 1961 under Park Chung Hee and his successors, when the bonds of religious affiliation were dissolved.
Yonhap's sources, however, say Kim takes other precautions -- based on lessons learned from the assassination of South Korean President Park Chung Hee by a subordinate during a banquet in October 1979 -- such as wearing a sidearm at all times.
This is Part I of an intended two-volume history of the leadership of Park Chung Hee, who brought economic growth and modernization to South Korea during 1960s-70s, but also increased militarization and political repression.
"Recasting Park Chung-hee's Authoritarianism: Myth, Realities and Legacies." Paper presented at the Workshop on Park Chung Hee and His Legacy: What Has Changed After Thirty Years, Korea Institute, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, April 22-23.