Parkes Observatory

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Parkes Observatory

(parks) (formerlyAustralian National Radio Astronomy Observatory) A radio astronomy observatory located near Parkes, New South Wales, Australia. It is operated by CSIRO's Division of Radio Astrophysics. The main instrument there is the Parkes dish – a fully steerable 64-meter telescope built in 1961 and now part of the Australia Telescope. It can observe at frequencies between 100 MHz and 45 GHz.
References in periodicals archive ?
Communicating with the Apollo 11 lunar module Eagle and sharing news of the 'giant leap' was made possible by the technology and teams at NASA's tracking stations at Goldstone, California and Honeysuckle Creek near Canberra, and CSIRO's Parkes radio telescope in NSW.
One extreme example was PKS 0735+178, discovered with the Parkes Radio Telescope in Australia.
The effort is being made possible with the help of Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization's (CSIRO) Parkes Radio Telescope ("Parkes") in New South Wales, Australia, and its upgraded instrumentation.
So far, several petabytes of data have been obtained using the world's largest steerable radio telescope at Green Bank, West Virginia, US, and the Parkes Radio Telescope in Australia.
Develop your knowledge and skills in astronomy at CSIRO's Parkes Observatory, home of the iconic 64 m Parkes radio telescope. Hear about the latest research in astronomy, trial classroom activities, learn new approaches to teaching astronomy and how to run a viewing night while networking with colleagues and professional astronomers, www.atnf.csiro.au/outreach/education/teachers/workshops
The Parkes radio telescope in New South Wales has been pointed towards Proxima Centauri, a red dwarf star 4.2 light years away.
It was first seen by chance in 2007, when astronomers went through archival data from the Parkes Radio Telescope in Eastern Australia.
He and his student David Narkevic were mining old data from Australia's Parkes Radio Telescope for oddly behaving pulsars, the rapidly spinning cores of dead massive stars.
The finding by an international team of astronomers marks the first time that a so-called "fast radio burst" has been detected using an instrument other than the Parkes radio telescope in Australia.
"It is more than 100 times the size of our galaxy, the Milky Way, which already stretches for 100,000 light years." Carretti and his colleagues at the CSLRO, using the Parkes Radio Telescope in New South Wales, have been analyzing a cluster of galaxies known as Abell 3667.
Edward George Bowen born; helped to develop radio astronomy in Australia; helped in the construction of the Parkes radio telescope and the Anglo-Australian telescope.
To mark the 50th anniversary of the historic Apollo 11 Moon landing, CSIRO Australia's national science agency, will be celebrating with open days at its Parkes Radio Telescope on Saturday 20 and Sunday 21 July.