Park

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park

1. a large area of land preserved in a natural state for recreational use by the public
2. a piece of open land in a town with public amenities
3. NZ an area, esp of mountain country, reserved for recreational purposes
4. a large area of land forming a private estate
5. English law an enclosed tract of land where wild beasts are protected, acquired by a subject by royal grant or prescription
6. an area designed and landscaped to accommodate a group of related enterprises, businesses, research establishments, etc.
7. US, Canadian, and NZ See car park
8. the park Brit informal a soccer pitch
9. a gear selector position on the automatic transmission of a motor vehicle that acts as a parking brake
10. a high valley surrounded by mountains in the western US

Park

1. Mungo . 1771--1806, Scottish explorer. He led two expeditions (1795--97; 1805--06) to trace the course of the Niger in Africa. He was drowned during the second expedition
2. Nick, full name Nicholas Wulstan Park. born 1958, British animator and film director; his films include A Grand Day Out (1992), which introduced the characters Wallace and Gromit, and the feature-length Chicken Run (2000)
3. Chung Hee. . 1917--79, South Korean politician; president of the Republic of Korea (1963--79); assassinated
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Park

A tract of land set aside for public use; a landscaped city square; also an expanse of enclosed grounds for recreational use within or adjoining a town.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Park

 

a tract of land with natural or specially planted vegetation and often including roads, footpaths, and bodies of water. Parks are used for rest and recreation. A formal park, such as Nizhnii Park in Petrodvorets (early 18th century), is marked by the geometric layout of paths, flower beds, pools, and other elements. The trees and shrubs are often trimmed. A landscape park, for example, the park in Pavlovsk (late 18th century), is usually subject to the relief of the area and thus is more reminiscent of actual nature. Such a park has lawns, ravines, small rivers, lakes, and ponds.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

park

An area, usually of public land set aside for recreation and leisure, usually owned and managed by a municipality, a state, a nation, or held by royal grant, or in some cases by private organizations.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

park

To retract the read/write head on a hard disk to its home location before the unit is physically moved in order to prevent damage. Most modern drives park themselves when the power is turned off. See drop protection.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in classic literature ?
Then down they had come at last to hover over City Hall Park, and it had crept in upon his mind,, chillingly, terrifyingly, that these illuminated black masses were great offices afire, and that the going to and fro of minute, dim spectres of lantern-lit grey and white was a harvesting of the wounded and the dead.
She was stationed over the temporary City Hall in the Park Row building, and every now and then she would descend to resume communication with the mayor and with Washington.
But before the dawn my courage returned, and while the stars were still in the sky I turned once more towards Regent's Park. I missed my way among the streets, and presently saw down a long avenue, in the half-light of the early dawn, the curve of Primrose Hill.
Northward were Kilburn and Hampsted, blue and crowded with houses; westward the great city was dimmed; and southward, beyond the Martians, the green waves of Regent's Park, the Langham Hotel, the dome of the Albert Hall, the Imperial Institute, and the giant mansions of the Brompton Road came out clear and little in the sunrise, the jagged ruins of Westminster rising hazily beyond.
Over the black pine-wood came flying and flashing in the moon a naked sword--such a slender and sparkling rapier as may have fought many an unjust duel in that ancient park. It fell on the pathway far in front of him and lay there glistening like a large needle.
Then the priest, a shorter figure in the background, said mildly: "I understood that Mr Boulnois was not coming to Pendragon Park this evening."
I was terribly afraid, from what I had heard of Blackwater Park, of fatiguing antique chairs, and dismal stained glass, and musty, frouzy hangings, and all the barbarous lumber which people born without a sense of comfort accumulate about them, in defiance of the consideration due to the convenience of their friends.
Catherick's visit to Blackwater Park, and that event might lead in its turn, to something more.
Norris, as they drove through the park. "Nothing but pleasure from beginning to end!
But when Amelia came down with her kind smiling looks (Rebecca must introduce her to her friend, Miss Crawley was longing to see her, and was too ill to leave her carriage)--when, I say, Amelia came down, the Park Lane shoulder-knot aristocracy wondered more and more that such a thing could come out of Bloomsbury; and Miss Crawley was fairly captivated by the sweet blushing face of the young lady who came forward so timidly and so gracefully to pay her respects to the protector of her friend.
Send for her to Park Lane, do you hear?" Miss Crawley had a good taste.
had Callie been born in England, he would have been honored as the most intrepid traveller of modern times, as was the case with Mungo Park. But in France he was not appreciated according to his worth."

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