Second Coming

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Second Coming

(less commonly), Second Advent
the prophesied return of Christ to earth at the Last Judgment
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The symbol of the Water of Creation is pasted on the beginning of the line, the Baby Jesus sleeping on golden hay (Redemption) is on the center and the Parousia (Last Judgment) marked by a Cross is on the end of the line.
For them, the thousand years, actually mentioned only in Revelation 20, is simply a metaphor for the entire Christian era from Pentecost to the single Parousia at the end of time.
These reflections thus provide a trinitarian alpha (source) and omega (goal), as it were, for Christian theological reflection, which presumes that what happens in between, after Pentecost but before Parousia, involves boundary crossing to and from the ends of the earth in and through the Spirit.
17) Interpreted correctly, according to Agamben, parousia does not mean a second messianic event/coming that supplements the first.
The parable of the man going on a journey points more to the tomb and resurrection world than the parousia.
To understand what would happen next, we must grasp the ancient idea of parousia.
The church Roberts founded reflected his one-sidedly spiritual approach to mission; in the absence of a plurality of teachers, its theology was informed almost solely by his understanding of God and mission, including his imminent expectation of the Parousia.
The dual nature of the feminine in Lawrence is related to the Shekhinah: on one hand, the female is Parousia, the fullness of Presence; on the other, the female is abject and weak--a form of kenomatic messianism.
Entranced by (largely) poststructuralist dream-poetics, Ross often conjures a clamor of beings, echoing them, and yet, Ross is enthralled by the pre-modern image of parousia (a Second Coming, to be present and beside), which he describes as "the coming of what cannot be known, cannot be anticipated, except the anticipation of the unexpected and unknown" (204).
The promise of the Parousia is the shadow of eternity in the historical; time itself is the trace of eternity.
Anticipation of the parousia is an implicit acknowledgment of some sense of absence; otherwise, there would be no particular sense of presence to anticipate.
45) As it pertains to the decomposition of presence specifically, Agamben looks to the Pauline conception of parousia as a complement to the remnant.