Parrhasius


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Parrhasius

(pərā`shēəs), fl. c.400 B.C., Greek painter. He was born in Ephesus but settled in Athens and is classed with the Attic painters. One of the greatest painters of Greece, a contemporary and rival of Zeuxis, he is credited by ancient writers with having been the first painter to attain perfect symmetry and correct proportions in his figures. Among the most celebrated of his numerous works were an allegorical painting, Demos, personifying the Athenian democracy, and Theseus. All his works have perished and are known only through descriptions by classical writers.

Parrhasius

 

(also known as Parrhasius of Ephesus), a Greek painter who worked in Athens in the late fifth century B.C.

The works of Parrhasius have not been preserved and are known only from descriptions. Ancient authors mentioned the artist’s skill in rendering mass through contour and chiaroscuro and his ability to represent physical suffering (his depiction of Philoctetes) and emotion (his depiction of Odysseus feigning madness).

REFERENCE

Rumpf, A. “Parrhasios.” American Journal of Archaeology, 1951, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 1–12.
References in classic literature ?
But why should I attempt to depict and describe in detail, and feature by feature, the beauty of the peerless Dulcinea, the burden being one worthy of other shoulders than mine, an enterprise wherein the pencils of Parrhasius, Timantes, and Apelles, and the graver of Lysippus ought to be employed, to paint it in pictures and carve it in marble and bronze, and Ciceronian and Demosthenian eloquence to sound its praises?
Aside from the question of authorship, forged as it was in a polemic between Aulus Janus Parrhasius and Alexander Minutianus, this learned commentary was the first to take questions of a text-critical nature into consideration and thus anticipated the commentaries of the later sixteenth century.
The story of Parrhasius (his name in the original Pliny) appears in Book 35, chapter 36, and does not include any such terms to connect the actions of Butades's daughter to the artistry of this ancient painter.
His rival, Parrhasius of Ephesus challenged him to a contest and invited Zeuxis to accompany him to his studio to see his painting, which was hanging behind a tattered curtain.
Confident of his success, Zeuxis asked Parrhasius to draw back the curtain covering his work, only to realise that the curtain itself was the painting and that Parrhasius had won the competition.
The grapes of Zeuxis were inartistic, unless in a bird's-eye view; and not even the curtain of Parrhasius could conceal his deficiency in point of genius.
Immature stages of Parrhasius polibetes (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae): host plants, tending ants, natural enemies, and morphology.
During the Arabian summer of 2014, "mating frenzies" of a Lycaenid butterfly resembling the native Small Cupid Chilades parrhasius were observed on three occasions at sites in urban and suburban Dubai by the authors, all individuals associated with the Dubai Natural History Group (DNHG) (Fig.
In one of the most famous artist legends, mentioned in the Naturalis Historic by Pliny the Elder, Zeuxis succeeded in misleading the birds with his painted grapes but he himself was misled by Parrhasius, who painted a curtain that his rival took to be real.
65, about the contest between the artists Parrhasius and Zeuxis, in which the latter produced a picture of grapes so accurately represented that birds flew up to the stage-building on which it was hung.
Today, on the wall of Duncan's architectural office and studio is a drawing by his own hand entitled Parrhasius and Socrates Discussing the Skill of Drawing (2008) (Fig.
In each dialogue the French author conversed, respectively, with Parrhasius and Leonardo da Vinci, who served as Fenelon's mouthpieces to declare his personal interest in classical statuary, in physiognomy and in the controversy on the preeminence of the Italian or French Schools of painting (347-62).