Parrhasius


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Parrhasius

(pərā`shēəs), fl. c.400 B.C., Greek painter. He was born in Ephesus but settled in Athens and is classed with the Attic painters. One of the greatest painters of Greece, a contemporary and rival of Zeuxis, he is credited by ancient writers with having been the first painter to attain perfect symmetry and correct proportions in his figures. Among the most celebrated of his numerous works were an allegorical painting, Demos, personifying the Athenian democracy, and Theseus. All his works have perished and are known only through descriptions by classical writers.

Parrhasius

 

(also known as Parrhasius of Ephesus), a Greek painter who worked in Athens in the late fifth century B.C.

The works of Parrhasius have not been preserved and are known only from descriptions. Ancient authors mentioned the artist’s skill in rendering mass through contour and chiaroscuro and his ability to represent physical suffering (his depiction of Philoctetes) and emotion (his depiction of Odysseus feigning madness).

REFERENCE

Rumpf, A. “Parrhasios.” American Journal of Archaeology, 1951, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 1–12.
References in classic literature ?
But why should I attempt to depict and describe in detail, and feature by feature, the beauty of the peerless Dulcinea, the burden being one worthy of other shoulders than mine, an enterprise wherein the pencils of Parrhasius, Timantes, and Apelles, and the graver of Lysippus ought to be employed, to paint it in pictures and carve it in marble and bronze, and Ciceronian and Demosthenian eloquence to sound its praises?
His rival, Parrhasius of Ephesus challenged him to a contest and invited Zeuxis to accompany him to his studio to see his painting, which was hanging behind a tattered curtain.
Confident of his success, Zeuxis asked Parrhasius to draw back the curtain covering his work, only to realise that the curtain itself was the painting and that Parrhasius had won the competition.
Immature stages of Parrhasius polibetes (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae): host plants, tending ants, natural enemies, and morphology.
In one of the most famous artist legends, mentioned in the Naturalis Historic by Pliny the Elder, Zeuxis succeeded in misleading the birds with his painted grapes but he himself was misled by Parrhasius, who painted a curtain that his rival took to be real.
Today, on the wall of Duncan's architectural office and studio is a drawing by his own hand entitled Parrhasius and Socrates Discussing the Skill of Drawing (2008) (Fig.
In the mythic competition between Zeuxis and Parrhasius, Zeuxis' illusionistic painting of grapes that tempted passing birds is found wanting in comparison to Parrhasius' painting with a curtain, which Zeuxis discovered, on reaching to draw back the curtain, was in fact a complete illusion.
Birds pecked at Zeuxis's painted bunch of grapes, convincing him he was the winner, but when he asked to have the curtain covering Parrhasius's picture removed and discovered that the curtain was the painting, he conceded the prize; Zeuxis had deceived nature but Parrhasius deceived the trained eye of a fellow artist.
Have students research Zeuxis independently, and then write the story about the famous contest he had with Parrhasius.
When Alexander had commanded none should paint him but Appelles, none should carve him but Lysippus, none engrave him but Pirgotales, Parrhasius framed a Table squared everye way twoo hundred foote, which in the borders he trimmed with fresh colours, and limmed with fine golde, leaving all the other roume with-out knotte or lyne, which table he presented to Alexander who no less mervailing at the bignes, than at the barenes, demaunded to what ende he gave him a frame without a face, being so naked, and with-out fashion being so great.
As evidence, he cited a famous comparison of two Theseuses, Hercules' purported friend: a rose-fed Theseus painted by Parrhasius and a beef-eater painted by Euphranor.
1 & 2), Parrhasius and Zeuxis, Renaissance artists and theorists spurred each other on to new heights.