Paradoxornithidae

(redirected from Parrotbill)
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Paradoxornithidae

 

a family of birds of the order Passeres. The body measures 10–27 cm in length, and the yellow beak often seems inflated. The tail is long and tapered. The coloring is brownish or yellowish, frequently with gray or black. There are 19 species distributed in Southeast Asia and only a single species in Europe and the steppe zone of Asia. Members of the family lead a settled or migratory life and inhabit shrub thickets or reeds. The nest is cuplike or covered and has a side entrance. The birds feed on insects and seeds. There are four species in the USSR: the bearded tit, Venus-throated parrotbill (Paradoxornis webbiana), long-tailed titmouse, and Yangtze parrotbill (P. heudei).

REFERENCE

Ptitsy Sovetskogo Soiuza, vol. 5. Edited by G. P. Dement’ev and N. A. Gladkov. Moscow, 1954.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Maui parrotbill (kiwikiu) uses its parrot-like bill to strip bark and break branches to search for insect larvae.
Other endemic Hawaiian species that are being propagated and managed in captivity at the two breeding centers, and which may soon become part of the release efforts, are the Maui parrotbill, the Hawaii 'akepa and creeper, the nene, and the 'alala.
The partnership, now called the Hawai'i Endangered Bird Conservation Program (HEBCP), operates the Keauhou and Maui Bird Conservation Centers and has established an excellent record of captive propagation; breeding and rearing several species of endemic honeycreepers, such as the Maul parrotbill (Pseudonestor xanthophrys), the Hawai'i 'akepa (Loxops coccineus coccineus) and creeper (Oreomystis mana), and the palila (Loxioides bailleui), as well as the endemic puaiohi or small Kaua'i thrush (Myadestes palmeri) and the 'alala or Hawaiian crow (Corvus hawaiiensis).
Another species, the Maui parrotbill (Pseudonestor xanthophrys), which was thought to be extinct until it was rediscovered in 1967 in an inaccessible valley in Maui, has an even stouter beak that it uses to cut branches when searching for the wood beetles it feeds on.
Home range and territoriality of two Hawaiian honeycreepers, the Akohekohe and Maui parrotbill.
Eight of these species are classified as federally endangered, and include 'Alala (Corvus hawaiiensis), Maui Parrotbill (Pseudonestor xanthophrys), Hawai'i Creeper (Oreomystis mana), Hawai'i 'Akepa (Loxops c.
Palila 1996- 109 80 61 (Loxioides bailleui) 2005 Puaiohi 1996- 777 228 195 (Myadestes palmeri) 2005 'Akohekohe 1997 6 6 6 (Palmeria dolei) Hawaii Creeper 1997- 36 19 17 (Oreomystis mana) 2005 Maui Parrotbill 1997- 29 17 15 (Pseudonestor 2005 xanthophrys) 'Apapane 1997 7 2 2 (Himatione sanguinea) Hawaii 'Akepa 1998- 38 20 18 (Loxops coccineus 2005 coccineus) 'Akiapola'au 2001 1 0 0 (Hemignathus munroi) 'Alala 1993- 337 146 80 (Corvus hawaiiensis) 2005 Nene 1998- 571 346 292 Branta sandvicensis 2005 Totals 2,044 948 757 Chicks % Hatch Survive to From Survival Species Year Independence Viable Eggs of Chicks Common 'Amakihi 1994- 21 81 100 (Hemignathus v.
Marking the first time the species has been bred in captivity, an endangered Maui parrotbill (Pseudonestor xanthophrys) chick hatched on July 21, 2000, at the Keauhou Bird Conservation Center on the island of Hawai'i.
The partnership, now called the Hawai'i Endangered Bird Conservation Program (HEBCP), operates the Keauhou and Maui Bird Conservation Centers and has established an excellent record of captive propagation; breeding and rearing several species of endemic honeycreepers, such as the Maui parrotbill (Pseudonestor xanthophrys), the Hawai'i 'akepa (Loxops coccineus coccineus) and creeper (Oreomystis mana), and the palila (Loxioides bailleui), as well as the endemic puaiohi or small Kaua'i thrush (Myadestes palmeri) and the 'alala or Hawaiian crow (Corvus hawaiiensis).
Hawaiian Bird Chick is a First" -- More information about the Maui parrotbill is available at http://pacific.
Other bird groups include Laughing Thrushes, Parrotbills, Fulvettas, Shrike Babbles, and Scimitar.
Egg rejection by both male and female Vinous-throated Parrotbills Paradoxornis webbianus.