Elgin Marbles

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Elgin Marbles

(ĕl`gĭn), ancient sculptures taken from Athens to England in 1806 by Thomas Bruce, 7th earl of ElginElgin, Thomas Bruce, 7th earl of,
1766–1841, British diplomat. He served on diplomatic missions to Vienna, Brussels, Berlin, and Constantinople.
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; other fragments exist in several European museums. Consisting of much of the surviving frieze and other sculptures from the ParthenonParthenon
[Gr.,=the virgin's place], temple sacred to Athena, on the acropolis at Athens. Built under Pericles between 447 B.C. and 432 B.C., it is the culminating masterpiece of Greek architecture. Ictinus and Callicrates were the architects and Phidias supervised the sculpture.
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, a caryatidcaryatid
, a sculptured female figure serving as an ornamental support in place of a column or pilaster. It was a frequently used motif in architecture, furniture, and garden sculpture during the Renaissance, the 18th cent., and notably, the classic revival of the 19th cent.
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, and a column from the ErechtheumErechtheum
[for Erechtheus], Gr. Erechtheion, temple in Pentelic marble, on the Acropolis at Athens. One of the masterpieces of Greek architecture, it was constructed between c.421 B.C. and 405 B.C. to replace an earlier temple to Athena destroyed by the Persians.
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, they were sold to the British government in 1816 and are now on view in the British Museum. Since then, the Greek government has sought the return of the marbles. Although British claims are based on Elgin's purchase of the sculptures, Greece has contested this, and its position has many supporters.

Bibliography

See T. Vrettos, The Elgin Affair (1997).

Elgin Marbles

A collection of sculptures, taken from the Parthenon in Athens by Lord Elgin; preserved in the British Museum since 1816. The finest surviving work of Greek sculptural decoration of the Classical age; the collection includes a number of metopes, fragments of pediment statues, and an extended series of blocks carved in low relief of the cella frieze.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Greeks, conversely, simply want the Parthenon Marbles to be on display in a museum in Greece instead of in London.
Now Greece has one of the most impressive museums in the world which could display the Parthenon marbles in close proximity and direct dialogue to the temple itself.
O'Hara also described the taking of the Parthenon marbles by Elgin as an "act of cultural vandalism."
The decision will impact a plethora of celebrity pieces, such as the Parthenon Marbles, the Sphinx Beard and the Rosetta Stone, to name a few.
Professor Anthony Snodgrass, of the British Committee for the Restoration of the Parthenon Marbles, said: "Athens is their home.
This is Ethiopia's equivalent of the Parthenon Marbles, rousing as much passion, and though the principle of returning the stelae has been established, the logistics have not.
The museum Greece is building at the base of the Acropolis to house the Parthenon Marbles, if Britain ever returns them, is causing controversy.
RUSSIA: Russian President Vladimir Putin has called for the return of the Parthenon Marbles to Greece during a tour of the ancient Acropolis.
The new pounds 29million Acropolis Mus-eum at the foot of the famous Unesco World Heritage site in Athens would remain empty unless the Parthenon Marbles were returned for display, they said.
If all had gone smoothly, the Parthenon Marbles', as the Greeks call them, would not be in the British Museum but in the Louvre, which does, in fact, have a small collection including a slab of the Parthenon frieze.
After we had introduced ourselves, I expanded on what I had previously written them--that I wanted to find whatever I could about Lord Elgin's taking of the Parthenon marbles during the first decade of the nineteenth century.
The mayor of Athens sent messages recalling the freedom of the city bestowed on him for his philhellenic services, latterly as chairman of the British Committee for the Restitution of the Parthenon Marbles. The ex-king of Greece apparently wanted to send a telegram of condolence (which the family refused to accept).