Parthenopaeus


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Parthenopaeus

(pär'thənōpē`əs): see Seven against ThebesSeven against Thebes,
in Greek legend, seven heroes—Polynices, Adrastus, Amphiaraüs, Hippomedon, Capaneus, Tydeus, and Parthenopaeus—who made war on Eteocles, king of Thebes.
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References in periodicals archive ?
No paternity is ever given for Parthenopaeus but Statius repeatedly emphasises Parthenopaeus' mother, Atalanta.
Parthenopaeus, the super-'Camilla/Pallas/Lausus'-in-one-bundle of gorgeousness, sexy gold tunic from mum's needle.
While Euripides and Sophocles refer to Parthenopaeus as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], (112) the compound Atalantiades is only found in Statius' Thebaid.
Statius repeatedly plays on the youthfulness of Parthenopaeus. (116) Parthenopaeus belongs to the type of warrior hero too young for war, the Heldenknabe.
Even during his death, Parthenopaeus must acknowledge his excessive youthfulness.
Indeed, Parthenopaeus is portrayed as an effeminate character, the ' Parthen-opaius' ('mAidan-face'.) (129) When Amphion taunts Parthenopaeus in Book 9, Parthenopaeus' response to Amphion's battle vaunts reveals his own suspicions of his masculinity, as he tells that he never engaged in womanly activities or acted like a Maenad (9.790-800.) Parthenopaeus taunts the Thebans for their association with Bacchus, their effeminate stereotypes and their contrast from the hunting reputation of the Arcadians: no Bacchant, Thyias, gave birth to him, nor has he ever carried the mitrae of the Bacchic rites.
In contrast to these four heroes, however, Parthenopaeus' matrilineality is repeatedly emphasised.
(75) Parthenopaeus is the only other character of the Theban to omit his father when talking about his own genealogy: Bernstein, In the Image of the Ancestors, 217, n.
(103) Parkes summarises the breadth of putative fathers and also suggests 'literary' fathers, Meleager, Hippomenes (or Melanion), figures who while not claimed to be fathers of Parthenopaeus in the Thebaid are subtly alluded to: R.
As Schetter notes, the language establishes Parthenopaeus as a [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and the phrase latuit in corpore vultus evokes Socrates' words to the young Charmides, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] ('if he were to undress, you would think he had no face, so beautiful was his appearance.' Charm.
Unlike Lausus, the young son of Mezentius in the Aeneid, who dies in defence of his father, Parthenopaeus does not die for pietas but "aus der Freude am Kampfen": Schetter, Untersuchungen zur epischen Kunst des Statius, 47.
Parkes, 'Notes and Discussions: Men from Before the Moon: The Relevance of Statius Thebaid 4.275-84 to Parthenopaeus and His Arcadian Contingent', Classical Philology 100.4 (2005): 361.