Parthian architecture

Parthian architecture

(400 B.C.–200 A.D.)
The architecture developed while under Parthian rule in Iran and western Mesopotamia, combining Classical with indigenous features.

Parthian architecture

An architectural style developed under Parthian domination (3rd cent. B.C. to 3rd cent. A.D.) in western Iran and Mesopotamia, combining classical with autochthonous features. Its major achievement is the monumental iwan covered by a barrel vault in stone or brick.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, regarding art, Iranian culture could not accept many elements of Greek art; despite great demand of Archaemenid and Parthian architecture on Greek art, Iranian culture could not accept it except for Corinthian order in Khureh.
Still urbanism in Hamedan (Ecbatana), Babel, and Shush is a valuable heritage, based on which Parthian urbanism was defined and Parthian architecture designed.
Unfortunately, nothing remains from the Parthian architecture, from which arch covering starts.