collider

(redirected from Particle collider)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Particle collider: Higgs boson, CERN

collider

[kə′līd·ər]
(particle physics)
References in periodicals archive ?
Department of Energy, this particle collider is a collaborative project of SLAC and the DOE's Lawrence Berkeley and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories.
From the quark-gluon plasma created in a particle collider, light pulses can be emitted, which carry valuable information about the plasma.
In the hunt for the Higgs boson, the world's most powerful particle collider has tightened the net.
4 million in superconducting wire over the next four years for a highly advanced particle collider being developed by a European research consortium.
The aggregate data throughput for CERN's next-generation particle collider, LHC, will exceed one terabit per second.
The measurement of the W boson mass will be one of the great scientific legacies of the Tevatron particle collider," added DZero co-spokesperson and Fermilab scientist Dmitri Denisov.
The Tevatron isn't the first particle collider to tantalize scientists at the end of its days.
The real-time data acquisition system will be used to collect, store and process data from a new particle collider being built at INFN's "Phi Laboratory," which conducts some of the most sophisticated particle-splitting, high-energy physics in the world.
Physicists working through the night on the new particle collider under construction at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) have achieved a major milestone: In the early morning of May 26 they successfully recorded the first events in the detector that surrounds the point where the massive machine`s two particle beams collide.
particle physics: With Fermilab's Tevatron, once the most powerful particle collider in the world, shutting down soon, the government laboratory is reconfiguring itself to focus on projects that require particularly intense beams and look for extremely rare events.
Washington, Aug 17 (ANI): Physicists working at the Fermilab Tevatron particle collider have offered clues as to why matter prevails over antimatter in the universe.
Physicists at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, including John Ellison, a professor of physics at UC Riverside, arrived at the result, by analysing billions of proton-antiproton collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron particle collider, and found a 1 percent excess of pairs of muons over pairs of antimuons produced in the decays of B-mesons.