Pascal's law

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Related to Pascal's principle: Bernoulli's principle, Archimedes Principle

Pascal's law

(päskälz`) [for Blaise PascalPascal, Blaise
, 1623–62, French scientist and religious philosopher. Studying under the direction of his father, a civil servant, Pascal showed great precocity, especially in mathematics and science.
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], states that pressure applied to a confined fluid at any point is transmitted undiminished throughout the fluid in all directions and acts upon every part of the confining vessel at right angles to its interior surfaces and equally upon equal areas. Practical applications of the law are seen in hydraulic machines.

Pascal's law

A law of physics which states that a confined fluid transmits externally applied pressure uniformly in all directions. More exactly, in a static fluid, force is transmitted at the velocity of sound throughout the fluid. The force acts normal to any surface. This natural phenomenon is the basis of the pneumatic fire, balloon, hydraulic jack, and related devices. See Hydrostatics

Pascal’s Law

 

a law of hydrostatics that states that the pressure exerted by external forces on the surface of a fluid is transmitted by the fluid uniformly in all directions. The law was established by B. Pascal (published in 1663). Pascal’s law has great importance for engineering; for example, it is made use of in hydraulic presses.

Pascal's law

[pa′skalz ‚lȯ]
(fluid mechanics)
The law that a confined fluid transmits externally applied pressure uniformly in all directions, without change in magnitude.