Pasquinade


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Pasquinade

 

a work with satirical distortions and malicious attacks intended to insult and compromise an individual, group, party, or social movement. The term is derived from the name of the Roman shoemaker Pasquino (15th century), an author of biting epigrams directed against people in high positions.

The pasquinade is most often used to discredit political opponents. For example, W. Menzel’s German Literature contained attacks on Schiller, Goethe, and modern French literature. M. A. Korf’s The Accession of Nicholas I to the Throne (1848), which blackened the reputation of the Decembrists, was compiled on the direct orders of Nicholas I. To repudiate Korf’s book, A. I. Herzen and N. P. Ogarev published a collection based on documentary evidence, December 14, 1825, and Emperor Nicholas. N. M. Iazykov and D. V. Davydov wrote pasquinades in verse to ridicule P. Ia. Chaadaev for his Philosophical Letter. Many writers, especially those connected with the liberation movement, were obliged to defend themselves from pasquinades. In Russian literature, the “antinihilist novel” acquired certain features of the pasquinade (for example, V. P. Kliushnikov’s The Mirage and A. F. Pisemskii’s Troubled Seas). Unlike the pamphlet, which it resembles in its denunciatory style, the pasquinade is not an officially recognized literary genre.

A. L. GRISHUNIN

References in periodicals archive ?
Now that Italian society has become increasingly secularised, and the power of the church has ostensibly decreased, contemporary pasquinades do not, in general, lampoon the Vatican.
The Investors' Pasquinade will look at what comprises return over and above traditional bottom-line numbers and present a broader measurement of success.
Some scholars view the above-mentioned pasquinade satirizing Urban VIII (Barberini) as apocryphal and unjust: "Barbari e Barberini: una 'pasquinata' ingiusta e apocrifa" (http://www.
She also situates his satirical works in relation to the genre of pasquinades, witty sayings and poems lampooning mostly prominent figures in the Roman Curia that since the early sixteenth century were customarily displayed on a certain particular in Rome ("Petrus Aretinus acerrimus virtutum ac vitiorum demonstrator').
The pasquinades characteristic satirical verses displayed on the ancient statue in Rome called `Pasquino') marking Leo's death in 1521 gave particular attention to his love of music, not as a praiseworthy characteristic but as a stick with which to beat him; one had the burden, `Mourn, musicians of Rome
One of Rynne's better pasquinades said it all: "Why the conciliar secrecy?
Insult to injury, the British have all the while been enjoying pasquinades of surpassing cruelty on Channel 4's electronic puppet show, Spitting Image, of which Americans have seen only a two-hour, highly sanitized sampling.
The controversial 1570 pasquinades taught Ribera that the University of Valencia and the urban oligarchy, like the Carroz, Mijavila, and Monzon families, had to be respected.
Accounts to reconcile: Anecdotes to pick up: Inscriptions to make out: Stories to weave in: Traditions to sift: Personages to call upon: Panygericks to paste up at this door: Pasquinades at that:
Unlike Marot, however, Du Bellay is inspired by Italian pasquinades and often engages in invective.
He will have views and prospects to himself perpetually solliciting his eye, which he can no more help standing still to look at than he can fly; he will moreover have various Accounts to reconcile: Anecdotes to pick up: Inscriptions to make out: Stories to weave in: Traditions to sift: Personages to call upon: Panygericks to paste up at this door: Pasquinades at that: -- All which both the man and his mule are quite exempt from.
For this and other pasquinades on Adrian, see Silenzi, 217-22; Marucci, 1:291.