Solar gain

(redirected from Passive solar gain)

Solar gain

Increase in temperature contributed to a space by the sun’s rays.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
5 TAP UP THE EXPERTS "If you're designing a house from scratch, talk to an architect who'll understand designing for orientation, passive solar gain, maximum winter sunlight, shading and minimum summer overheating.
TURN TO THE EXPERTS "If you're designing a house from scratch, talk to an architect who'll understand designing for orientation, passive solar gain, maximum winter sunlight, shading and minimum summer overheating.
5 TAP UP THE EXPERTS Kevin said: "If designing a house from scratch, talk to an architect who'll understand designing for orientation, passive solar gain, maximum winter sunlight, shading and minimum summer overheating.
Products with higher gain are ideal for applications where passive solar gain is more important than solar control, as well as north-facing buildings where high visible transmission is important.
In phase two, the pergola was designed, constructed, and installed by two different wood construction classes, providing shade from the summer sun while still allowing passive solar gain in the winter.
"The large windows let in so much sunlight and this has resulted in passive solar gain which, combined with a modern heating system and substantial insulation, gives us relatively cheap heating bills."
The building was oriented south for optimal passive solar gain. After establishing the solar exposure, we harvested the surrounding trees for firewood.
The building was oriented south for optimal passive solar gain. Once the solar window was established, the surrounding trees were harvested and used for firewood.
The homes will utilise passive solar gain and air tightness and very high standards of insulation including triple glazed windows.
The team also wanted to work with the land to ensure optimal placement of the building for passive solar gain. While the site threw them a curveball and dictated that the building actually face 30 degrees off of south, they came up with a solution of breaking the building's southern facade into short pieces that could be rotated directly south for solar access.
Known as passive solar gain, this can be quite substantial even in winter.
It has enhanced mass for passive cooling and night flush, south facing glazing for passive solar gain, radiant floor heating and cooling, and hybrid ground source heat pumps.