Pasteurella


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Related to Pasteurella: Pasteurella pestis

Pasteurella

A genus of gram-negative, nonmotile, nonsporulating, facultatively anaerobic coccobacillary to rod-shaped bacteria which are parasitic and often pathogens in many species of mammals, birds, and reptiles. It was named to honor Louis Pasteur in 1887. Genetic studies have shown that Pasteurella, together with Haemophilus and Actinobacillus, constitute a family, Pasteurellaceae.

The genus contains at least 10 species. Pasteurella multocida causes hemorrhagic septicemia in various mammals and fowl cholera, and is occasionally transmitted to humans, mainly in rural areas. Human pasteurellosis may include inflammation in bite and scratch lesions, infections of the lower respiratory tract and of the small intestine, and generalized infections with septicemia and meningitis. Pasteurella canis and P. stomatis may cause similar, though generally less severe, infections in humans after contact with domestic or wild animals. Although drug-resistant Pasteurella strains have been encountered, human Pasteurella infections are as a rule readily sensitive to the penicillins and a variety of other chemotherapeutic agents. See Antibiotic, Drug resistance

Pasteurella

 

a genus of nonspore-forming pathogenic bacteria; named in honor of L. Pasteur, who studied them. The bacteria are nonmotile, gram-negative, short (0.3–1 X 0.8–2 μ) bacilli that stain bipolarly—that is, the ends of the cell stain more darkly. On solid nutrient media, pasteurellas form grayish or yellowish mucoid colonies, and on beef-extract-peptone broth they form a grayish film and impart turbidity to the broth. Facultative aerobes, they weakly ferment carbohydrates without forming a gas and have an optimum growth temperature of 37°C.

Individual species of Pasteurella cause cholera in chickens, and pasteurellosis in other birds and in mice, rats, rabbits, swine, cattle, and horses. Pasteurella pestis is the causative agent of plague in man and rodents, including susliks and rats. Plague is transmitted from rodent to rodent and from rodent to man, chiefly by infected fleas.

Pasteurella

[‚pas·chə′rel·ə]
(microbiology)
A genus of gram-negative, nonmotile, nonsporulating, facultatively anaerobic coccobacillary to rod-shaped bacteria which are parasitic and often pathogens in many species of mammals, birds, and reptiles, it was named to honor Louis Pasteur in 1887.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both metagenomic protocols conclusively identified Pasteurella spp.
Bacteroides ovatus isolated in mixed culture with Pasteurella multocida is considered to act synergistically in the pathogenic process.
Recurrent Septicemia and Osteomyelitis caused by Pasteurella multocida in a Patient with Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia.
Pasteurella multocida produces a protein with homology to the P6 outer membrane protein of Haemophilus influenzae.
Pasteurella multocida was grown on Mueller-Hinton broth and broth was centrifuged 3000 xg for 30 min and supernatant was discarded.
Analysis of the Images of LPS Lectin Histochemistry and Indirect Immunoperoxidase Staining of Pasteurella multocida.
Both dual-action hybrids showed very good MIC against tested bacterial strains, that is, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, and Bacillus subtilis (Table 2).
ABSTRACT: Minimum inhibitory concentration was performed against metronidazole that allowed the growth of Pasteurella multocida type1 (B6) but inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli which is capable of spoiling vaccine during its production and showed no growth in concentration of 3.2 ug/ml.
Endophytic fungi from tropical ethnoveterinary plants and their antibacterial efficacy against Pasteurella multocida Capsular Type A strain