Pasteurella


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Related to Pasteurella: Pasteurella pestis

Pasteurella

A genus of gram-negative, nonmotile, nonsporulating, facultatively anaerobic coccobacillary to rod-shaped bacteria which are parasitic and often pathogens in many species of mammals, birds, and reptiles. It was named to honor Louis Pasteur in 1887. Genetic studies have shown that Pasteurella, together with Haemophilus and Actinobacillus, constitute a family, Pasteurellaceae.

The genus contains at least 10 species. Pasteurella multocida causes hemorrhagic septicemia in various mammals and fowl cholera, and is occasionally transmitted to humans, mainly in rural areas. Human pasteurellosis may include inflammation in bite and scratch lesions, infections of the lower respiratory tract and of the small intestine, and generalized infections with septicemia and meningitis. Pasteurella canis and P. stomatis may cause similar, though generally less severe, infections in humans after contact with domestic or wild animals. Although drug-resistant Pasteurella strains have been encountered, human Pasteurella infections are as a rule readily sensitive to the penicillins and a variety of other chemotherapeutic agents. See Antibiotic, Drug resistance

Pasteurella

 

a genus of nonspore-forming pathogenic bacteria; named in honor of L. Pasteur, who studied them. The bacteria are nonmotile, gram-negative, short (0.3–1 X 0.8–2 μ) bacilli that stain bipolarly—that is, the ends of the cell stain more darkly. On solid nutrient media, pasteurellas form grayish or yellowish mucoid colonies, and on beef-extract-peptone broth they form a grayish film and impart turbidity to the broth. Facultative aerobes, they weakly ferment carbohydrates without forming a gas and have an optimum growth temperature of 37°C.

Individual species of Pasteurella cause cholera in chickens, and pasteurellosis in other birds and in mice, rats, rabbits, swine, cattle, and horses. Pasteurella pestis is the causative agent of plague in man and rodents, including susliks and rats. Plague is transmitted from rodent to rodent and from rodent to man, chiefly by infected fleas.

Pasteurella

[‚pas·chə′rel·ə]
(microbiology)
A genus of gram-negative, nonmotile, nonsporulating, facultatively anaerobic coccobacillary to rod-shaped bacteria which are parasitic and often pathogens in many species of mammals, birds, and reptiles, it was named to honor Louis Pasteur in 1887.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pneumonia in pigs induced by intranasal challenge exposure with pseudorabies virus and Pasteurella multocida.
We used RAPD assays to identify different strains of Pasteurella trehalosi type 2 non-hemolytic (hereafter referenced simply as P.
In vitro susceptibility testing may not be necessary for isolates when multiple organisms are present since empiric therapy for mixed infections is usually effective against Pasteurella as well.
Other species of Pasteurella can cause human disease such as P.
There was no evidence of Pasteurella multocida (fowl cholera) infection.
Interaction of cold stress and Pasteurella haemolitica in the pathogenesis of pneumonia pasteurelosis in calves: Changes in pulmonary function.
The microorganisms used were: (1) bacteria: Pasteurella haenzolytica A1, Pasteurella multocida A:3, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Enterococcusfaecalis (old nomenclature Streptococcus faecalis), Actinomycespyogenes, Salmonella dublin, Bacillus thu ringiensis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa.
The new vaccine, a true child of high tech, was created by deleting a large piece of a gene called aroA from each of three culprit bacteria: Pasteurella haemolytica, P multocida, and Haemophilus somnus.
A fines de 1855, durante un nuevo brote, esta vez en la provincia china de Yunnan, el bacteriologo frances Alexandre Yersin identifico el bacilo que causa la enfermedad: Pasteurella pestis.
These include Bacillus cereus, Yersinia enterocolitica, Pasteurella multocida, Stentrophomonas, Acinetobacter Iwoffi, and Planococcus.