Trisomy

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trisomy

[′trī‚sō·mē]
(cell and molecular biology)
The presence in triplicate of one of the chromosomes of the complement.

Trisomy

 

the presence of one or a few nonhomologous extra chromosomes in the chromosome set of a diploid organism. Organisms (or cells) in which one, two, or more chromosomes present themselves as three homologues are called simple trisomics, double trisomics, and so forth. Trisomy is caused by the failure of chromosomes to separate (nondisjunction) during cell division. Some specific severe disorders are the result of trisomy occurring in specific chromosomes.

References in periodicals archive ?
A blood sample will also be taken from you and your age and the information from these two tests is used to work out the risk of the baby having Down's Syndrome, or Edwards' or Patau's syndromes.
Dr Anne Mackie, Director of Programmes for the UK NSC, supported by Public Health England, said: 'Edward's Syndrome and Patau's Syndrome can be detected through a scan, which is currently offered to all women between 18 and 20 weeks of pregnancy in England as part of the NHS Fetal Anomaly Screening Programme.
Kids with Edwards' or Patau's syndrome are born severely deformed and profoundly retarded; they normally don't live' more than a few months.
In utilizing chromosome probes to enumerate chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X and Y, the procedure can identify disorders such as Down's Syndrome, Edward's Syndrome, Patau's Syndrome, Kleinfelter's Syndrome, XYY Syndrome, Triple X Syndrome and Turner's Syndrome.