maternal effect

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maternal effect

[mə′tərn·əl i‚fekt]
(genetics)
Determination of characters of the progeny by the maternal parent; mediated by the genetic constitution of the mother.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Quantitative evolutionary geneticists generally interpret statistically significant paternal effects on progeny phenotype (when pollen donors are mated with a random or shared array of maternal plants) as evidence for the presence of additive genetic variation among pollen donors in the observed trait(s).
This analysis confirmed the importance of [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE 2 OMITTED] among-female effects, but was ambiguous with respect to paternal effects (Table 1).
To control for the possibility that the negative variance components and paternal effect might be artifacts of an unbalanced crossing design, we used a maximum likelihood method to determine whether the paternal effect would persist when negative variance components were constrained to zero.
These variances indicated that the traits studied were under the influence of both maternal and paternal effects with additive and dominant genes.
Scientists made the discovery while engaged in a project to work out the molecular blueprint of a paternal effect gene.
However, whether a paternal effect or a response to selection, the effect is not in the direction expected; offspring developed slower on the host their father was reared on.
There is strong paternal effect of sperm DNA damage at all stages of embryonic development.
One distinct paternal effect is that fathers seem to provide a "wake-up call" with their stimulation that complements the more soothing styles mothers use with babies; the outcome is that as early as 30 days after birth, newborns behave differently with their fathers and mothers.
The first of these interpretations depends on an assumption that the nuclear genotype of sires has a negligible influence on offspring phenotype, apart from Mendelian transmission, i.e., that variance due to additive genetic paternal effect ([V.sub.Ap]) is negligible.
Significant paternal effects were found for days to emergence, days to first leaf (Table 2B), and seed mass per fruit (Table 3B), and there was also an indication of a paternal effect on days to second leaf (P = 0.09).
Paternal effects have traditionally been assumed to be minimal (Roach and Wulff 1987), even though experimental designs often have not been capable of detecting them (Milligan 1991).
Paternal effects on the human sex ratio at birth: evidence from interracial crosses.