Griselda

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Griselda

(grĭzĕl`də), long-suffering heroine of medieval story, whose husband subjects her to numerous trials in order to test her devotion. The story originated in a widespread W European folktale patterned in part upon the story of Cupid and Psyche. The tale of Griselda was used by Boccaccio in the Decameron, by Petrarch, by Chaucer in the "Clerk's Tale," and by Thomas Dekker in the comedy Patient Grissell.

Griselda

endures husband’s cruelty nobly. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Clerk’s Tale”; Ital. Lit.: Decameron, “Dineo’s Tale of Griselda”]

Griselda

lady immortalized for patience and wifely obedience. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Clerk of Oxenford’s Tale”]
References in periodicals archive ?
She covers Griselda: from ambiguoius fictive character to the embodiment of various ideals, the socio-political implications of social exogamy, and the state-as-household metaphor and tyranny in the patient Griselda myth: between political criticism and literary convention as propaganda.
Yet rather than picking elements from the three crowns and transplanting them directly and literally onto seventeenth- and eighteenth-century stages, Zeno modified, adapted, and recast a number of fourteenth-century heroes, converting Boccaccio and Petrarch's patient Griselda into his own constant Griselda-Costanza duo, and Dante's Christian Stoic Cato into his own, eighteenth-century Neostoic Luceio.
Most of the characters of Churchill are hardly content in the end of their stories except Patient Griselda who represents the patriarchal society.
Among them are Victorian explorer Isabella Bird (Marisa Tomei); Lady Nijo (Jennifer Ikeda), a 13th century Japanese courtesan-turned-Buddhist nun; Pope Joan (Martha Plimpton), believed to have headed the Vatican for a brief stint in the ninth century while disguised as a man; Patient Griselda (Mary Catherine Garrison), an obedient wife depicted in Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales"; and Dull Gret (Ana Reeder), the warrior who led her fellow village women to battle the demons of Hell in Brueghel's painting.
Brown first examines the genealogy of Griselda, discussing Chaucer's reworking of Boccaccio and Petrarch before turning to works such as A Winter's Tale and The Tragedy of Mariam, whose silent, suffering heroines are modeled on the patient Griselda. Because Brown is interested in what she calls the "cracks" in the Griselda myth, she focuses her attention on the shrew-like "counter-Griselda," the subordinate character who ignores her mistresses' examples, challenges her decisions, and yet remains fiercely loyal.
Seated around a dinner table are the alleged female Pope Joan from the 9th century, the feisty Victorian traveller Isabella Bird, Lady Nijo, the concubine of a 13th century Japanese emperor, and Chaucer's doomed Patient Griselda.
The characters are the supposed 9th-century female Pope Joan, the Victorian explorer and traveller Isabella Bird, Lady Nijo, the 13th-century Japanese Emperor's concubine, Patient Griselda from Chaucer, Dull Grett or Mad Meg from Pieter Brueghel's 16th-century painting and Marlene, and a 1980s career girl who is pivotal - and a surprise - to the overall theme.
Ferdinand LeRoy refers to Patient Griselda as his model wife and announces that he has "a horror of woman's rights, in every form.
"Household Business "synthesizes some important recent feminist and materialist work in the subfield of "domestic drama," while reading plays in the Patient Griselda and the village witch traditions, along with domestic tragedies and some comedies.
Gillian's topic is Chaucer's "Patient Griselda," a story she does not like precisely because it seems so emblematic.
Chaucer borrowed the story of Patient Griselda from Petrarch's Latin translation of Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron.
Three other essays discuss reworkings of Chaucer's tales: Piero Boitani, in an extended intertextual study, shows how Dryden 'improved' and Fletcher and Shakespeare 'radically reinvented' the Knight's Tale; Helen Cooper follows the 'shape-shiftings' of the Wife of Bath; and Anna Baldwin gives a balanced assessment of possible sources in Patient Griselda texts for The Winter's Tale.

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