Patientia

Patientia

[‚pä·shē′en·chə]
(astronomy)
An asteroid with a diameter of about 153 miles (247 kilometers), mean distance from the sun of 3.06 astronomical units, and B-type (C-like) surface composition.

Patientia

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Patientia, asteroid 451 (the 451st asteroid to be discovered, on December 4, 1899), is approximately 280 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 5.4 years. Its name is a personified form of the word patience. In a natal chart, Patientia’s location by sign and house indicates where and how one is most likely to be patient. When afflicted by inharmonious aspects, Patientia may show impatience or a pattern of being forced to wait for results. If prominent in a chart (e.g., conjunct the Sun or the ascendant), it may signify an exceptionally patient person or an individual for whom the cultivation of patience is a life goal.

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(289 and 291) Patientia, then, seizes the opportunity of Ira's irascible suicide to flesh out her moral dissertation: "Fury is its own enemy; fiery wrath in her frenzy slays herself and dies by her own weapons" (291).
(33.) Ellis (2008 [1901], 175) proposed the "Lucretian" emendation, bruta est illi patientia victo, which Goodyear (1965, 176) calls an "absurdity," but which is better understood as an over-correction in the direction of the target of the personification.
Anti-inflammatory compounds[24] and seven known phenolic compounds were found in the roots of Rumex patientia which possess cytotoxic effects and radical scavenging properties [25].
The personification of Faith is accompanied by Patience (Patientia) and Fortitude (Fortitudo), with the inscription: Sincera constantis animi puritate perficitur (She is perfected through the genuine purity of a faithful heart).
The Latin word for patience is "Patientia", and its prefix "Pati" means the ability to endure pain and stay the course.
Una vez mas se hace referencia al verdadero y nuevo cultus y--esto si que es una novedad--a la importancia de practicar la virtud de la patientia en orden a vivir las virtudes de la integritas y la castitas.
Una di queste era la professione del cortigiano: infatti, se dimentichiamo l'idealizzazione del Castiglione, la vita vera del cortigiano dobbiamo cercarla in opere come Aviso de' favoriti et dottrina de' cortigiani di Antonio de Guevara, o nei Dialogo del cortigiano di Giovanni Andrea Gilio, oppure il De patientia di Celio Calcagnini.
Instead, the Christians make their distinctive and potent contribution to the common good nonviolently, by praying as a "special army of piety." Lactantius is a fascinating case for writers on this subject; my sense is that Kalantzis, helpfully alert to the eschatological environment in which Lactantius was functioning and his eleventh-hour shifts that justify Constantine's military victories, may underplay Lactantius's commitment to patientia (nonviolent patient endurance), which pervades his Divine Institutes.
(4) The English patience, of course, comes from the Latin patientia, derived from the verb patior "to suffer," so the ideas of patience and suffering were inextricably linked for authors who knew Latin well.
(25.) Diacon AH, Pym A, Grobusch M, Patientia R, Rustomjee R, Page-Shipp L, et al.

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