Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge

Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge

Address:510 1/2 W Morton St
PO Box 217
Oakland City, IN 47660

Phone:812-749-3199
Fax:812-749-3059
Web: www.fws.gov/midwest/patokariver
Established: 1994.
Location:In Pike and Gibson counties in southwest Indiana.
Facilities:Trails, wildlife viewing sites.
Activities:Fishing, canoeing, hunting, hiking, wildlife observation, educational programs.
Special Features:Refuge provides some of the best wood duck production habitat in the state, and is home to the largest nesting colony of interior lest tern east of the Mississippi River.
Habitats: 5,131 acres of river corridor with wetlands and bottomland hardwood forests.
Access: Daylight hours year round.
Wild life: 380 species of wildlife including bald eagle (threatened), Indiana bat (endangered) and interior least tern (endangered).

See other parks in Indiana.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge being an intersection between critically depleted oak savannas and bottomland, restoring this land properly is a priority.
With American Forests--and other stakeholders such as Alcoa Foundation, Friends of the Patoka, and all the southwest Indiana residents who stand to gain from a healthier refuge--helping restore the Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge, things will only continue to get better.
Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge: Expand migratory game bird hunting, upland game and big game hunting, and sport fishing.
The proposed rule also includes opening sport fishing of state-regulated species for the first time at Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge in South Dakota, and expanding areas available for sport fishing at Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge in Indiana.
The Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge and Management Area (hereafter Patoka River Refuge or the Refuge) represents one of the largest intact bottomland hardwood forests in southern Indiana, with meandering oxbows, marshes, ponds, managed moist-soil units, and constructed wetlands that provide diverse and suitable habitat for wildlife.
Therefore, odonates warrant study in an area, such as the Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge and Management Area (hereafter Patoka River Refuge or the Refuge), where they are poorly understood.
The final rule also includes opening sport fishing of state-regulated species for the first time at Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge in South Dakota, and expanding areas available for sport fishing at Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge in Indiana.