Patriarchal Economy

Patriarchal Economy

 

a primitive land-cultivation or nomadic stock-raising economy. The patriarchal economy arose in the period of disintegration of the primitive communal system as a result of the breaking away of large patriarchal families, which became independent economic units. The patriarchal economy is a subsistence economy, producing for direct consumption.

References in periodicals archive ?
His behavior illustrates the kind of pederastic love French feminist Luce Irigaray argues underlies a patriarchal economy in which wealth and power are transmitted between men; Trimalchio's monologue puts into words the process by which a commodity transforms to an agent of exchange.
Gatz would have been seventeen around 1910, in the era of the women's suffrage movement, so we might surmise that the things older, sexually experienced women are "hysterical" about have something to do with the treatment of women by men and with the role of women in a patriarchal economy. Not one to join in women's "hysterical" rage, the poor and powerless Gatz turns his attention to the source of wealth, power, and privilege in American society: older, wealthier, and more powerful men.
One important concept is that of representation, which in the case of heterosexual love depends entirely on the ideologies (plural, as proposed by Foster) supplied by the patriarchal economy (the management of acts in the social space, the act-space) and adopted by society on the demand side of such an economy.
As she starts talking to Gavin in the final meeting, Eula quite eloquently expresses the entrapment of her and Linda's lives within the exploitative patriarchal economy. She painfully narrates how Flem has trapped Linda with "father-daughter love" (324-28) which finally makes Linda draw up the will: "my share of whatever I might inherit from my mother ...
Oliver and Trigo build their case by illustrating how "women are seen as property" (201) within the male gangster world of the film and "patriarchal economy is one of violent competition, revenge, and suspicion between men" (202).
Refreshingly, Greer does not feel the need to offer a comfortable resolution of this tension but gives a thought-provoking analysis of the tales from the standpoint of Lacanian psychonalytic theory (she also draws heavily on Freud and Kristeva), which she uses as a tool to duplicate Zayas's conflictive position as a writer within a patriarchal economy who espouses its discourse while simultaneously reworking and challenging that discourse.
Rather than the site of women's productive skilled labor as weavers, the home in this narrative becomes the place where male domestic mastery over women results in their unskilled support of an increasingly patriarchal economy. In a like manner, Drake narratives posit a primal moment of "clothing" the natives--and thus imaginatively create a market for English goods that universalizes this commercial sense of English male mastery.
While this story dramatizes Gallop's concept of a breakdown in paternal power due to the father's illicit desire, at the same time, Peri Rossi's vision offers a more radical assault on conventional patriarchal economy. By portraying an infant who instinctively refuses to submit to her "feminine destiny," Peri Rossi re-imagines and re-writes the margins, transforming the victimized infant into an agent capable of assuming her own social subjectivity.(6)