patriarchate

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Related to Patriarchates: Autocephalous, matriarchate

patriarchate

1. the office, jurisdiction, province, or residence of a patriarch
2. a family or people under male domination or government
References in periodicals archive ?
After the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, Ukraine endeavoured to establish religious independence and established an Orthodox Church of the Kiev Patriarchate. From the post-90s era, the Ukrainian nationalists were demanding to set their church free from Russian control, which dates back to 1686, when the Constantinople patriarch had signed an agreement to give religious leaders in Moscow authority over the Orthodox Church in Ukraine.
In response to Ukraine's approach the Moscow Patriarchate also warned its worshippers not to attend any services conducted by clergy loyal to Constantinople and they would also boycott joint Orthodox Church ceremonies.
NNA - Head of the Bloc of Reform and Change, General Michel Aoun, accompanied by a delegation of members of said bloc, on Tuesday visited the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Deir Balamand in Koura, to express solidarity with the patriarchate after the abduction of two metropolitans in Aleppo yesterday.
Yet, later on, a new statement issued by the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Balamand saying that the patriarchate has thus far received no tangible evidence of the release of the two metropolitans.
The Ministry concluded its statement by stressing that those who are stirring sedition will fail "because we are one people with our various affiliations and because our fraternity as Muslims and Christians over ages represents civilization at its best forms." Patriarchate of Antioch and all East for Greek Orthodox and Patriarchate of Antioch and all East for Syriac Orthodox condemned the abduction of the two Bishops, while they were returning to Aleppo.
Meanwhile, Melkite Greek Catholic Patriarchate in Damascus strongly condemned the abduction of the two Bishops by an armed terrorist group in Aleppo countryside, calling on all sides to preserve their lives and release them.
By far the most valuable section is part 3: a thorough study of the way Vatican II treated the role of the patriarchates. M.
Part 4, as already noted, outlines some of the postconciliar writings on patriarchates by various ecclesiologists.
Even with the collapse of the Soviet Empire in 1988-89, the Moscow patriarchate still tried to hold on to the Ukraine and Belarus churches, opposing the restoration of the Ukrainian Catholic church, and then setting up a puppet regime of a Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the Moscow patriarchate.
The patriarchate of Jerusalem is the oldest in Christianity and traces it roots back to James the brother of Jesus.
It was then that Cardinal Myroslav-Ivan wrote from Rome to the Moscow Patriarchate proposing a public and formal gesture of mutual forgiveness.
There is no state religion; however, the UOC-Moscow Patriarchate and the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church tend to dominate in the east and west of the country respectively.