Patricians


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Patricians

 

in ancient Rome the term seems originally to have encompassed the entire native population of the clan commune that constituted the Roman people (Populus Romanus Quiritium), as opposed to the plebeians. After the separation of noble aristocratic families from the tribe, the patricians became a clan aristocracy.

Beginning in the sixth century B.C., in the period of the formation of class society and the state, the patricians became the ruling class-estate of the Roman Republic. The economic foundation of their power was the exclusive right to use public lands (the ager publicus). After the plebeians were included in the Roman people and were granted equal rights with the patricians (the beginning of the third century B.C.), the top strata of the patricians—the patriciate—and plebeians merged to form the nobility. Under the empire, a new patriciate developed, consisting of the privileged members of the senatorial estate and natives of Italy and the provinces who were elevated to patrician status by the emperor.

References in periodicals archive ?
By the 1880s, patrician power in the trading towns of the Swahili coast was being challenged by the increasing volatility of this commercialized world - by the Swahili patricians' need to fend off Zanzibari intrusions, by the growing numbers of people from the African interior living in the towns, by the diversity of demands being made by clients and allies.
Could they be the real Florentine patricians (a term that Molho seems uncomfortable with)?
unprecedented degree of patrician withdrawal and self-consciousness
Stanley Chojnacki, Women and Men in Renaissance Venice: Twelve Essays on Patrician Society
[6] As part of this program, he patronized a number of learned patricians with whom he shared a love of classical antiquity.
Some of its patrician burghers owned impressive libraries, among them humanist and imperial councillor, Konrad Peutinger.
In such a ritualized and significant process in which the private lives of the Venetian patricians and the public reputation of the city-state were so inextricably combined, there were expectations to be fulfilled and patterns to be followed.
In Venice, fashion and the environmental situation contributed to their widespread use by courtesans and patricians alike although they were periodically subjected to legislation.
Samuel Cohn has argued on the basis of statistics on residence and marriage patterns that, in contrast to patricians whose city-wide identity was apparent in their political affiliations and family alliances, the working classes looked largely to their local communities.
Sebaldus churches with their wealth of oversize family crests can attest, the local patricians with their social ambitions and pretensions are equally the target of Durer's wit.
One such struggle was between patricians and plebeians.
Florentine Patricians and Their Networks: Structures Behind the Cultural Success and the Political Representation of the Medici Court (1600-1660)