Patroclus

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Patroclus

(pətrō`kləs): see AchillesAchilles
, in Greek mythology, foremost Greek hero of the Trojan War, son of Peleus and Thetis. He was a formidable warrior, possessing fierce and uncontrollable anger. Thetis, knowing that Achilles was fated to die at Troy, disguised him as a girl and hid him among the women at
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Patroclus

 

in Greek mythology, a participant in the Trojan War and the friend of Achilles.

Achilles had withdrawn from battle because of a quarrel with Agamemnon. When the Trojans broke into the Greek camp in order to set fire to the Greek ships, Patroclus asked Achilles’ permission to join in the combat. After putting on his friend’s armor, Patroclus drove the Trojans back from the ships, but he himself was slain by Hector. The legend of Patroclus is found in the Iliad.

Patroclus

wore the armor of Achilles against the Trojans to encourage the disheartened Greeks. [Gk. Lit.: Iliad]
References in periodicals archive ?
El conjunto intenta destacar el caracter heroico de los personajes representados y, en el caso de los funerales de Patroklos en particular, la centralidad de la tumba del heroe y los ritos celebrados en su honor conforman una tematica adecuada para el contexto de este monumento, donde el duelo de Aquiles y su sed de venganza aparecen representados de forma idealizada, aludiendo a la "bella muerte" caracteristica de la ceramica apula inspirada en episodios tragicos (9).
Petry's words reminded us of those of Achilles in Iliad 9, that simile then prompted us to think about a number of other Homeric metaphors and similes, such as one in which Achilles compares Patroklos to a little girl running after her mother, when Patroklos comes to Achilles in tears because of the devastating losses the Greeks are sustaining while Achilles remains out of battle (Iliad 16.
Had it not been for Moira, Apollo and Euphorbos, poor Straton would probably not have been so mangled: his intertextual debt to Patroklos comes at a price.
And a great battle stretched out over Patroklos, burdensome and woeful, and Athena stirred the battle coming down from the sky: for far-thundering Zeus sent [her] down to rouse the Danaans: for his mind had in fact turned [to them].
That the ambivalent sense of power and pity engendered by such a viewing experience was, in its mythological form, particularly popular with the Romans is demonstrated by the fact that the Pasquino group survives in no fewer than fourteen known copies, while its erotic equivalent, representing Achilles and Penthesilea, was on occasion even displayed together with the Menelaos and Patroklos group, as in the Hadrianic baths at Aphrodisias.
Hektor is revived and assists Apollo in a counterattack (262-404); the Greeks retreat, the Trojans reach the ships, Patroklos finally leaves Eurypylos's hut to get Achilleus and urge him to reenter the battle (390-404), and the two armies fight before the ships (405-591).
I knew I had found what I was unknowingly seeking on the day my freshman Humanities teacher - a petite woman with an immense vocabulary, the only person I'd ever met who spoke in perfectly formed sentences - stood up in class and started talking about Achilleus' desperate response to the death of his friend Patroklos.
Such is the case with the lines devoted to the death of Patroklos in the Iliad.
In the Iliad, for example, games are held to honour the fallen Patroklos, friend of Achilles.
Thetis uses the reverse of the image for fife; when she hears Achilles' cries of grief for the dead Patroklos, she says to her sister Nereids:
The epic turns on that extinguishing of care that will cause so much grief, a loss that forcibly reminds Achilles of his failure to take care, to fulfil the essential role of protector--of Patroklos in the first instance [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 18.
Not only is the role of the Mother dimly visible in the creation of the Imaginary space here, and the mixing of the beloved remains of Akhilleus and Patroklos, but so, too, is Dionysos, the god of drama and dithyramb, who provides the artistic form in which the remains are mingled.