Patrolling


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Patrolling

 

a method of covering a definite area of the terrain, air space, or water by patrol parties for the purpose of observation, defense, or security. Patrolling may be done on foot or by motorcycles, combat or transport vehicles, airplanes, helicopters, or ships. Patrolling consists of periodic walks, drives, flights, or cruises around the assigned areas or on definite routes.

The composition of a patrol party depends on its mission and type and may include a group or subunit of servicemen and one or two aircraft or ships. Patrols are also organized in all garrisons to maintain order and military discipline among servicemen on the streets and in public places. For this purpose, garrison patrols are appointed, consisting of the patrol leader, who is an officer or a sergeant, and two or three patrol soldiers or seamen. In inhabited localities, on roads, and on the water, patrols may be organized by organs of the militia to maintain public order.

References in periodicals archive ?
The newest Infantry School doctrine on dismounted patrolling can be found in FM 3-21.
Patrolling fulfills the Infantry's primary function of finding the enemy to either engage him or report his disposition, location, and actions.
The discussion of patrols and patrolling in the new manual is not totally new.
There are some issues concerning patrolling doctrine that always generate discussion and which are sometimes not understood clearly.
One of the issues that always comes up in discussions about patrolling is the need for commanders to be specific when they give a unit the mission to send out a patrol.
In fact, under a different name, the same sort of patrol was described in the 1967 version of FM 21-75, Combat Training of the Individual Soldier and Patrolling.
Furthermore, officers on bikes can cover more territory in less time and with less effort than officers patrolling on foot.
Other days the two won't receive a single call, but spend their time checking tips or patrolling businesses, providing security.
On a normal day Engels will spend about 50 percent of his time working on daily assigned calls such as illegal dumping or family disturbances, and the other half patrolling his area.