Patronymic


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Patronymic

 

in the USSR, the second part of a person’s name, based on the father’s first name and received by a child during the registration of birth. If a child is born to an unmarried woman (if legal paternity is not established), the patronymic is registered according to the mother’s wishes. Patronymics may be changed when a person reaches 18 years of age, in accordance with the Decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR of Mar. 26, 1971, On the Changing of Surnames, Given Names, and Patronymics by Citizens of the USSR (Vedomosti Verkhovnogo Soveta SSSR [Bulletin of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR], 1971, no. 13, art. 146).

References in periodicals archive ?
The final example of the patronymic for Tydeus occurs at the very start of his aristeia: the son of Oeneus is eminent.
In Homer, seers generally have a patronymic. (52) A similar pattern can also be seen in Vergil.
Statius, however, repeatedly uses the patronymic, Oedipodionides, (68) to refer to Polynices suggesting that he will share in his father's impietas.
Feminines like this however would also have paired with masculines--here *manava--that when used with reference to a person would almost exclusively have functioned as patronymic adjectives, and this specialization, together with the general frequency of the masculine, must have favored descent-marking as the default interpretation of most such feminine derivatives.
this differentiation was achieved through the structural reanalysis of Proto-Indo-Iranian *HnariH-(d) 'woman/wife of the H[degrees]' (46) while in the "thematic" indrani-type recourse was had to a secondary specialization of the genitival and patronymic suffix *-aHna-/-aHnaH- Proto-Indo-Iranian inherited together with Greek.
102, Yt.576 [degrees] iiana-), which is a phypercharacterization of the patronymic naotairiia-(Yt.5.98) to naotara_(Yt.17.55, 56, 15.35).
A second barrier to the recognition of patronymics as `significant' lies in the consideration that the choice of a patronymic rather than a name often depends on metrical utility.
the fact that a patronymic serves a technical purpose in this way need not prevent it from also being employed for a particular effect.
And use of the patronymic [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (or variant) is surely allied to this central idea.
Names composed of a Greek name and Oscan patronymic, or alternatively an Oscan name and Greek patronymic, are also documented from Velia and Naples.(25) Indeed the examples from Naples include a series of epitaphs from a chamber tomb of the 1st century A.D.
1614), the apparent cognomen seems more likely to be an Oscan patronymic, taken from the nomen of the father, and with the filiation or libertination omitted.
BCH 36, 84 6 (including the Herakleote Titos Satyrionos, his son Titos Titou, and his grandchildren Theodora, Satyros and Posidippos; or the Tarentines Demetrios Dazou and Parmenion Dazymou, whose patronymics indicate Messapian connections) and IG 12.3.1233 (Noumerios Leontos of Tarentum).