Patronymic

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Patronymic

 

in the USSR, the second part of a person’s name, based on the father’s first name and received by a child during the registration of birth. If a child is born to an unmarried woman (if legal paternity is not established), the patronymic is registered according to the mother’s wishes. Patronymics may be changed when a person reaches 18 years of age, in accordance with the Decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR of Mar. 26, 1971, On the Changing of Surnames, Given Names, and Patronymics by Citizens of the USSR (Vedomosti Verkhovnogo Soveta SSSR [Bulletin of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR], 1971, no. 13, art. 146).

References in periodicals archive ?
All the rest is punctuated by prudent assertions that the patronym acquired by the former slave is less arbitrary than one might imagine and that it makes sense to keep in mind the possibility of names chosen by the freed people themselves (p.
A second factor is the use of a patronym, obviously more important upon the death of a father figure, whether a true father, an adoptive father, or a step-father.
A Dyula patronym could represent a disadvantage for careers in the Civil Service, could expose its bearer to a lengthy document check and possibly harassment at police roadblocks, and so forth.
3 and 4": The patronym Adad-sar-ili should be indexed as well; the seals together show the three generations: Sin-iddinam di.kud S.
Text 17, 3: Patronym should be restored as [Da.sup.!]-mi-iq-DN.
Dandamayev's principles for inferring ethnicity, descent, and geographical origin from the etymologies of personal names and patronyms arise from general suppositions about immigration and contact.
Zimakk[a.sup.[contains]]: Zi-ma-ga-[-.sup.contains]], patronym of Ha-an-da-uk(!)-ku BM 7446:4 (= Piches, Nimroud Central Saloon, 120 no.
Gunia: -i or -ya adjective or patronym formed with Iranian *gauna- (cf.Hinz, Altiranisches Sprachgut der Nebenuberlieferungen, 98 s.v.
Sissokos and Sakilibas (common Mande patronyms) moving from Sudan settled in Wolofophone western Senegal as Gueyes (Gueye is the Wolof equivalent of Sissoko and Sakiliba); Falls and Coulibalys could alternate their family names based on local linguistic practices, political considerations and personal inclinations.
That said, he examines such aspects of medieval personal names in the region as patronyms and metronyms with -son, The North as a mosaic, occupational bynames, topographies, and early-modern comparisons.
Inuit often bore only one name, thwarting outsiders' habit of organizing individuals into family trees based on patronyms. Annie Meekitjuk Hanson goes beyond these outsiders' problems to delve into the meaning of names within Inuit culture.
Noting that the word 'surname' was not defined in the BDRA, she said the dictionary meaning of this word was family name, which she said was different from those who only have patronyms.