patterned ground


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patterned ground

[′pad·ərnd ′grau̇nd]
(geology)
Any of several well-defined, generally symmetrical forms, such as circles, polygons, and steps, that are characteristic of surficial material subject to intensive frost action.
References in periodicals archive ?
Four broad landscape categories received the most attention: (1) steep slopes where landslides occur, (2) coastlines where sand, gravel, and boulders can move by wave and ice action, and (3) the nearly bare surfaces of the Tablelands and Trout River Gulch where various forms of patterned ground occur, and (4) the valleys and beds of brooks and rivers where banks erode, channels switch, and sediments move.
Modelling patterned ground distribution in Finnish Lapland: An integration of topographical, ground and remote sensing information.
Patterned ground occurs wherever rainfall is low (50-700 mm) and has been found on every continent (Valentin et al.
To prevent the penetration of the electric field of a coplanar line in the substrate in the case of low-resistivity silicon, a patterned ground shield is added beneath the line [4], and decreased the attenuation at 60 GHz from 1.
Microstrip lines with patterned ground such as slots or/and etched patches (DGS) and defected microstrip structure (DMS) have attracted a lot of attention due to their unique characteristics.
Moreover, dual spiral with patterned ground structure (PGS) are applied to enhance the mutual inductance of top and bottom spiral and to reduce the shunt capacitance of spiral resonator, causing almost identical SRF value.
rock glaciers, scree slopes, patterned ground, earth hummocks, debris cones, solifluction lobes and solifluction terraces.
If it has held steady for the past 15 million years, as many think, the evidence might be inscribed in the patterned ground.
Patterned Ground as Evidence of Extensive Permafrost in the Saginaw Lowlands, Michigan, During the Late Pleistocene, Randal
Images taken by the Mars Global Surveyor, now orbiting the Red Planet, suggest that most areas with geological features known as patterned ground appear at high latitudes, the same regions where large quantities of ice may lie just under the planet's surface.
His last major publication in 1997, Memoir 190 of the Geological Society of America, was about patterned ground on Cornwallis Island in Arctic Canada, as was his GSA Memoir 22 about Victoria Island in Arctic Canada 50 years earlier.