Morphy

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Morphy

Paul. 1837--84, US chess player, widely considered to have been the world's greatest player
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In Faulkner's novella, the gallant Southern chess player epitomized by the graduate-at-law Paul Morphy informs the anachronistically chivalrous, chess-playing lawyer Gavin Stevens.
Harriss sidesteps, via an urban form of courtship nurtured (presumably) by a twentieth-century cityscape, the rural version of chivalry that still holds currency among the majority of Yoknapatawphians, and Harriss's business dealings in New Orleans, which coincide with Faulkner's sojourn there in the mid-1920s, again conjure the specter of Paul Morphy into the intertextual connections of this chess-soaked novella.
What interests a critic here, then, is how Faulkner's chess-playing knight emerges from the maw of structuralist abstraction that fatally trapped Paul Morphy. Morphy's decision to turn his back on chess after his European tour--take off his knightly armor, so to speak--and go into the law profession was a bold one.
Gavin Stevens, whom Christopher Matthew describes as "one of nature's noblemen, a practitioner of the law who stands out among lawyers" (3), hereby secures his prize thanks to an endgame in keeping with the approach of the "chivalrous lawyer-chess player" Paul Morphy, but tempered to the exigencies of the war-tom twentieth century.
The Exploits and Triumphs, in Europe, of Paul Morphy, The Chess Champion.
Instead, it was probably Paul Morphy (1837--1884), "the greatest chess genius in history" then and even now, according to recent world chess champion Bobby Fischer.
Beauregard's troops had taken Fort Sumter on April 14, 1861, many New Orleans citizens eagerly enlisted in the Confederate cause, but not Paul Morphy. A few months later, he visited Beauregard in Richmond, Virginia, the Southern capital.
Buck's Paul Morphy, His Later Life, a pamphlet that appeared in 1902.
(The latter wrote The Exploits and Triumphs in Europe of Paul Morphy.)