Pavlof Volcano

Pavlof Volcano,

active volcano, 8,177 ft (2,493 m) high, W Alaska Peninsula, SW Alaska, on the W shore of Pavlof Bay. It and its neighboring twin volcano, Pavlof Sister, 7,028 ft (2,142 m) high, are largely snow-covered, cone-shaped mountains. A stratovolcano, Pavlof Volcano is the most consistently active volcano in the Aleutian arc, having erupted frequently since the late 18th cent.; its largest historical eruption occurred in 1911. Pavlof Sister last erupted in 1762.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Pavlof Volcano

 

a volcanic massif in Alaska near the southern end of the Alaska Peninsula, on the west bank of the Gulf of Alaska. Elevation, 2,504 m. The Pavlof Volcano has erupted several times in the 19th and 20th centuries. Its slopes are nearly bare, and there are subarctic meadows at its base.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The eruption of Alaska's Pavlof Volcano has caused flight delays and cancellations for thousands of travelers, according to Squaremouth, a travel insurance comparison website.
Los Angeles, Jumada II 21, 1437, March 30, 2016, SPA -- Alaska's volcano authority Tuesday lowered its alert level for the erupting Pavlof volcano from red to orange as the emissions slowed, the Alaska Volcano Observatory said, according to dpa.
Pavlof Volcano, which has been spewing ash and lava for years in an uninhabited region nearly 600 miles (966 km) southwest of Anchorage, erupted with new intensity this week and prompted Alaska scientists to issue their highest volcanic alert in five years on Monday.
"Earthquake activity remains steady and well above normal" at Pavlof Volcano on the Aleutian arc, and vigorous lava flow is continuing, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory.
Augustine has been joined by the Pavlof volcano, which spewed out ash plumes up to 53,000 feet high in mid-April.
The agency says the Pavlof Volcano, which is about 600 miles southwest of Anchorage, erupted at 4:18 p.m.