Pea Aphid

Pea Aphid

 

(Acyrthosiphon pisum), an insect of the order Homoptera, family Aphididae.

The body of the pea aphid is 4–5 mm long and velvety green in color. The insect is found in’Europe, Asia, North America, and Northern Africa. It damages alfalfa, clover, fodder legumes, peas, vetch, soybeans, and other legumes. It winters in the egg phase in perennial legumes. In spring it hatches, and from June through August it produces as many as ten generations parthenogenetically. It reproduces intensively on sappy young vegetation in moderately moist, warm weather. A bisexual generation appears in autumn and lays its eggs. Pea aphids can reduce a harvest considerably by sucking the sap from stems, leaves, and pods. Protective measures include treating the crops with aphicides and early sowing of early maturing varieties of cereals and legumes.

O. I. PETRUKHA

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Our project sequence started with direct contact and investigation of a single species, the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), before including the other species involved in its complex ecological community.
The pea aphid, a pest known to feed on 600 different crops and plants, is a prime example.
Feeding and nutrition of the pea aphid Acyrthisiphon pisum (Homoptera: Aphididae), on chemically defined diets a various pH and nutrient levels.
Washington, Feb 23 (ANI): Scientists from more than 10 nations took part in the sequencing and analysis of the genome of the pea aphid, which is considered as the "mosquito" of the plant world.
Among the most specialized and well-studied of these evolutionary partnerships is the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum and its endosymbiont, Buchnera.
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Thermal constants for development of the pea aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae) and its parasites.
It shows that both ecological interactions within a food web and the potential for rapid evolutionary adaptation play critical roles in determining how populations of the legume-loving pea aphid fare during increasing bouts of hot weather, one aspect of predicted climate change.
Van Giessen says he has used the pea aphid as a model system because it is larger than most aphids and feeds on a variety of crops besides peas.
Amino acid composition of phloem sap and the relation to intraspecific variation in pea aphid (Acyrtosiphon pisum) performance.