Peaking Transformer

peaking transformer

[′pēk·iŋ tranz‚fȯr·mər]
(electricity)
A transformer in which the number of ampere-turns in the primary is high enough to produce many times the normal flux density values in the core; the flux changes rapidly from one direction of saturation to the other twice per cycle, inducing a highly peaked voltage pulse in a secondary winding.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Peaking Transformer

 

a transformer that converts a sine voltage to a pulse voltage whose polarity changes every half-period. One of the simplest designs of a peaking transformer has a magnetic circuit with cores of different thickness. The secondary winding is placed around the thinner core. When a sine current flows through the primary winding, a magnetic flux is generated in the magnetic circuit. This flux saturates the thinner core of the magnetic circuit even for low values of current intensity. As a result, the electromotive force induced in the secondary winding is of the pulsed (peaked) type. Peaking transformers are used chiefly as pulse generators in high-voltage research equipment and in automation devices.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.