Peasant Question

Peasant Question

 

the question of the historical destinies of the peasantry and of the role of the peasantry and its place in the revolutionary transformation of society. This question is related to the agrarian question and to the alliance of the working class and the peasantry.

References in periodicals archive ?
He covers Russia's noble estate; educating the Russian nobility; the nobility in local government and administration; the Tsar, the nobility, and reforming Russia; government, nobility, and the Peasant Question; and the radical nobility challenges autocracy.
At the end of the nineteenth century, the two currents, liberal and conservative political struggle continued on the peasant question. Conservatives declared themselves against fragmentation surfaces in small batches, demonstrating that 920,000 peasants who had about 50 of the country in small areas is a step backwards more than the 300,000 landless peasants .
('Why did the Peasants Revolt?') published in the autumn of 1907, in which Rosetti accused not only the political parties but the ruling class as a whole of having intentionally neglected the peasant question. In 1910, offering a socialist viewpoint, the Bessarabian Social Democrat Constantin Dobrogeanu-Gherea described the peasant situation as one of neoiobagia (neo-slavery), which should be abolished by ending the contract system and by allowing the rural proletariat to leave the country for the cities to become industrial workers.
Thanks to this incisive and fruitful study, no doubt the (Russian) peasant question will revive.
Given my own work on the agrarian petite bourgeoisie in Canada, I found Wood's article on the agrarian roots of capitalism, Lewontin's chapter on the proletarianization of farmers, and Araghi's piece on the peasant question on the cusp between millennia lucid and controversial.
The related and unresolved peasant question generates in turn violent patriarchal reactions or neopatriarchal convulsions (Ivekovic, 1996), which are characteristic of threatened agrarian communities.
Politically a socialist, Kruczkowski became famous upon the publication of his first novel, Kordian i cham (1932; "Kordian and the Churl"), which--as the author himself put it--was "an attempt to show the peasant question in Poland from the broad perspectives of historical development." Pawie piora (1935; "Peacock's Feathers") is another book about the peasant movement, and Sidla (1937; "The Trap") concerns the condition of white-collar workers.