Peat Wax

peat wax

[′pēt ‚waks]
(materials)
A hard, waxy material extracted from peat; it is similar to, and a substitute for, montan wax.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Peat Wax

 

a product obtained in the processing of peat tar. A distinction is made between crude peat wax, a dark brown to black pitchlike mass with a melting point of 50°–75°C; detarred peat wax; and refined peat wax. The tar is extracted from peat by organic solvents, such as benzine, ethylene dichloride, and mixtures of alcohol and benzene. The tar yield is 3–8 percent of the absolutely dry material. The composition of crude peat wax is 40–45 percent wax, 40–45 percent paraffin, and 10–20 percent tar. Detarred peat wax is obtained by treating crude peat wax with cold benzine; the refined product is obtained by treating detarred peat wax with sulfuric acid and potassium dichromate. Peat wax is used to prepare molds for the production of precision castings and to impregnate electrodes. It also finds various applications in the plastics industry.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.