Pedantry


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Pedantry

Blimber, Cornelia
“dry and sandy with working in the graves of deceased languages.” [Br. Lit.: Dombey and Son]
Casaubon, Edward
dull pedant; dreary scholar who marries Dorothea. [Br. Lit.: Middlemarch]
Caxton, Austin
erudite bookworm. [Br. Lit.: The Caxtons]
Choakumchild, Mr.
pedantic master of Gradgrind’s school. [Br. Lit.: Hard Times]
Conseil
taxonomically talented servant of Prof. Aronnax. [Fr. Lit.: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea]
Dalgetty, Rittmaster Dugald
garrulous pedant. [Br. Lit.: A Legend of Montrose]
Fluellen
pedantic Welsh captain and know-it-all. [Br. Lit.: Henry V]
Holofernes
shameless pedagogue-schoolmaster. [Br. Lit.: Love’s Labour’s Lost]
Sampson, Dominie
old-fashioned, donnish scholar. [Br. Lit.: Guy Mannering]
Scriblerus, Martinus
learned fool. [Br. Lit.: Benét, 909]
Thwackum
selfish and ill-humored clerical pedagogue. [Br. Lit.: Tom Jones]
References in periodicals archive ?
My services are no longer required, in the sense that I am freed of any obligation to go to the office, write a column several times a week and otherwise make myself useful as an editor of nagging perceptiveness and uncommon pedantry.
However, whether it is a recession or a "slowdown" - as data presently indicates - is a matter of mere pedantry.
In a well-researched piece of sociocriticism, Ralph Albanese points out that the Republican regime of 1870 perceived Les Femmes savantes as a lesson in the dangers of specialization: that is, pedantry.
This point might be pure pedantry were it not indicative of one of the principal shortcomings of this work: it is in severe need of good editing and proofreading.
Devoid of pedantry, the tone invites young YAs to enjoy and discover as well as to learn.
Although the voice-over rattles off a litany of data, the voice fades in and out of the sound track (which includes electronic ambient sound by Tim Partridge as well as more upbeat music taken from an informational video), functioning more as background noise than hectoring pedantry, and the images themselves approach abstraction.
With this in mind let me add that OHR readers might enjoy Chapter Four in Ian Tyrell's Historians in Public: The Practice of American History, 1890-1970 (University of Chicago Press, 2005), which he titles "The Crusade Against Pedantry and Its Aftermath: Allan Nevins and Friends, 1930s-1960s.
But the spirit of this book transcends such pedantry.
Drawing a distinction between the written and spoken word, Today radio presenter Humphrys explains, without pedantry, how the 'mangling and manipulation' of what he calls our common language, not only offends the grammarians but can distort meaning and even have a depersonalising effect in areas, such as health, which are supposed to be quintessentially people-centred (a phrase that Humphrys would probably hate).
As I write this last editorial I'm aware that, whilst the arcane world of editing with its pedantry and labour-intensive tasks is not for everyone, I have been hugely privileged to experience it.
One traditionalist pointed out that Poulter was actually wearing plus-twos rather than plus-fours, but such pedantry aside, it can't be too much of a coincidence that he ended up with a plus-one score for the day.
The matter was extremely complicated, but in May 1902 he denounced 'adherence to economic pedantry, to old shibboleths' which hindered 'opportunities of closer union which are offered us by our colonies' and 'our power to keep British trade in British hands'.