peer group

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peer group

a GROUP of individuals of equal status. The term is most generally applied to children and adolescents, who experience a very different influence on their SOCIALIZATION by interacting in groups of their own age, as compared to the hierarchical family experience. see also YOUTH CULTURE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Parents can't make their children love books by reading aloud to them every night; they can only throw them in the way of peer groups in which reading is valued, or at least not derided.
Other findings included learning that black peer groups were smaller than white peer groups; black females reported the smallest number of friends in a peer group.
In large organizations, the array of peer groups is incredibly complex.
This cost-effectiveness comparison is based on a peer group average for a hypothetical patient panel that matches the physician's panel in terms of age group characteristics and percentage of high-cost patients.
Peer groups, and discs containing the user's current collection, can be updated annually at a cost of $1,000 for each update.
This report contains a competitive company benchmarking analysis based on key financial and operating parameters and ratios of a select peer group of companies, compared to one another and to overall global averages for their retail channel.
Periodic reports should compare investment performance with an appropriate index, peer group and to the policy statement's objectives.
degrees in counseling psychology and with school counselor certification moderated the Web-based and in-person multicultural supervision peer groups.
For example, choosing a mutual fund that is performing well in relation to its peer group would be prudent today - but it may not be in the future if its performance declines.
It was surmised that low achievers experience pressure from high SES parents and peer groups, thus leading to low self-concept.
Peer Groups and Children's Development considers the experiences of school-aged children with their peer groups and its implications for their social, personal and intellectual development